Bertha Scully

F, #139101, b. circa May, 1870
Bertha Scully|b. circa May, 1870|p1392.htm#i139101|Michael Welsh Scully|b. circa May 27, 1839\nd. Aug, 1918|p1391.htm#i139100|Mary Frances Robbins|b. Aug 21, 1842|p1391.htm#i139099|Michael Scully||p3967.htm#i396636|Margaret Walsh||p3967.htm#i396637|Andrew Robbins|b. Sep 26, 1804\nd. Sep 26, 1891|p28.htm#i2729|Lucretia Covenhoven|b. Dec 3, 1807\nd. Dec 26, 1891|p5.htm#i476|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Bertha Scully was born circa May, 1870 at New Jersey. She was the daughter of Michael Welsh Scully and Mary Frances Robbins.
     In the census on Jun 11, 1880 Bertha Scully was named Mary Scully.
CensusJun 2, 1900Somerville, Somerset County, New Jersey, 9 children, 7 living

Florence MacNichol

F, #139102, b. circa 1887
Florence MacNichol|b. circa 1887|p1392.htm#i139102|Charters K. MacNichol|b. circa 1862|p1391.htm#i139089|Irene Conover|b. circa 1862|p1391.htm#i139088|||||||Michael F. Conover||p1391.htm#i139086|Mary R. Thompson||p1391.htm#i139087|

Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Florence MacNichol was born circa 1887 at Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Charters K. MacNichol and Irene Conover. Florence married Gilbert H. Heim on Mar 30, 1912.

Gilbert H. Heim

M, #139103
     Gilbert married Florence MacNichol, daughter of Charters K. MacNichol and Irene Conover, on Mar 30, 1912.

William Grover Conover

M, #139104, b. Jul 9, 1799, d. Aug 25, 1884
William Grover Conover|b. Jul 9, 1799\nd. Aug 25, 1884|p1392.htm#i139104|Wiliam Kovenhoven|b. Dec 2, 1767\nd. Sep 24, 1838|p36.htm#i3504|Mary Grover|b. Mar 29, 1778\nd. Jan 6, 1817|p36.htm#i3505|William Covenhoven|b. Jun 8, 1742\nd. Oct 17, 1777|p35.htm#i3500|Deborah Voorhees|b. circa 1742|p36.htm#i3501|John Grover|b. Feb 14, 1745/46\nd. Aug 17, 1829|p2374.htm#i237326|Elizabeth Robbins|b. May 12, 1753\nd. Feb 15, 1786|p2374.htm#i237327|

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      William Grover Conover was born on Jul 9, 1799 at Penn's Neck, Mercer County, New Jersey. He was the son of Wiliam Kovenhoven and Mary Grover. William married Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo, daughter of William Bastedo and Euphemia Longstreet, before 1828. William Grover Conover died on Aug 25, 1884 at age 85.
CensusAug 20, 1860Hightstown, West Windsor Twp., Mercer County, New Jersey, real estate value 600.00, personal property 125.00
Census-OccAug 20, 1860a day laborer

Children of William Grover Conover and Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo

Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo

F, #139105, b. Jan 30, 1805, d. Aug 22, 1889
Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo|b. Jan 30, 1805\nd. Aug 22, 1889|p1392.htm#i139105|William Bastedo|b. May 6, 1781\nd. Jul 21, 1814|p2903.htm#i290215|Euphemia Longstreet|b. Dec 3, 1780\nd. Jan 8, 1862|p2902.htm#i290194|||||||||||||
      Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo was born on Jan 30, 1805 at Crossroads, Burlington County, New Jersey. She was the daughter of William Bastedo and Euphemia Longstreet. Elizabeth married William Grover Conover, son of Wiliam Kovenhoven and Mary Grover, before 1828. Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo died on Aug 22, 1889 at age 84.
     She was also known as Elizabeth Bastedo.
CensusAug 20, 1860Hightstown, West Windsor Twp., Mercer County, New Jersey, real estate value 600.00, personal property 125.00

Children of Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo and William Grover Conover

William Bastedo Conover

M, #139106, b. Jul 5, 1828, d. Dec 14, 1906
William Bastedo Conover|b. Jul 5, 1828\nd. Dec 14, 1906|p1392.htm#i139106|William Grover Conover|b. Jul 9, 1799\nd. Aug 25, 1884|p1392.htm#i139104|Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo|b. Jan 30, 1805\nd. Aug 22, 1889|p1392.htm#i139105|Wiliam Kovenhoven|b. Dec 2, 1767\nd. Sep 24, 1838|p36.htm#i3504|Mary Grover|b. Mar 29, 1778\nd. Jan 6, 1817|p36.htm#i3505|William Bastedo|b. May 6, 1781\nd. Jul 21, 1814|p2903.htm#i290215|Euphemia Longstreet|b. Dec 3, 1780\nd. Jan 8, 1862|p2902.htm#i290194|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      William Bastedo Conover was born on Jul 5, 1828 at Penn's Neck, Mercer County, New Jersey. He was the son of William Grover Conover and Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo. William married Lydia C. Thompson on Nov 20, 1850. William Bastedo Conover died on Dec 14, 1906 at North Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York, at age 78.
      He held the position of constable circa 1863 at Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York.



CensusJul 8, 1870Mount Pleasant, Westchester County, New York, no real estate personal property 100.00
CensusJun 16, 1880Mount Pleasant, Westchester County, New York
OccupationJul 8, 1870a miller
OccupationJun 16, 1880a carpenter

Children of William Bastedo Conover and Lydia C. Thompson

William married Lydia C. Thompson on Nov 20, 1850.

Lydia C. Thompson

F, #139107, b. circa 1832
      Lydia C. Thompson was born circa 1832 at New Jersey. Lydia married William Bastedo Conover, son of William Grover Conover and Elizabeth Longstreet Bastedo, on Nov 20, 1850.
CensusJul 8, 1870Mount Pleasant, Westchester County, New York, no real estate personal property 100.00
CensusJun 16, 1880Mount Pleasant, Westchester County, New York

Children of Lydia C. Thompson and William Bastedo Conover

Voorhis Charles Conover

M, #139108, b. Nov, 1856
Voorhis Charles Conover|b. Nov, 1856|p1392.htm#i139108|William Bastedo Conover|b. Jul 5, 1828\nd. Dec 14, 1906|p1392.htm#i139106|Lydia C. Thompson|b. circa 1832|p1392.htm#i139107|William G. Conover|b. Jul 9, 1799\nd. Aug 25, 1884|p1392.htm#i139104|Elizabeth L. Bastedo|b. Jan 30, 1805\nd. Aug 22, 1889|p1392.htm#i139105|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Voorhis Charles Conover was born in Nov, 1856 at New York. He was the son of William Bastedo Conover and Lydia C. Thompson. Voorhis married Viola Sophia Hanks in 1878.
CensusJun 15, 1880Hebron, Washington County, New York
CensusJun 12, 1900Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York, 7 children, 5 living
Census-OccJun 15, 1880a farmer
Census-OccJun 12, 1900a carpenter

Children of Voorhis Charles Conover and Viola Sophia Hanks

Voorhis married Viola Sophia Hanks in 1878.

Viola Sophia Hanks

F, #139109, b. Aug, 1857
      Viola Sophia Hanks was born in Aug, 1857 at New Jersey. Viola married Voorhis Charles Conover, son of William Bastedo Conover and Lydia C. Thompson, in 1878.
CensusJun 15, 1880Hebron, Washington County, New York
CensusJun 12, 1900Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York, 7 children, 5 living

Children of Viola Sophia Hanks and Voorhis Charles Conover

Ernest Reuel Conover

M, #139110, b. Oct 3, 1884
Ernest Reuel Conover|b. Oct 3, 1884|p1392.htm#i139110|Voorhis Charles Conover|b. Nov, 1856|p1392.htm#i139108|Viola Sophia Hanks|b. Aug, 1857|p1392.htm#i139109|William B. Conover|b. Jul 5, 1828\nd. Dec 14, 1906|p1392.htm#i139106|Lydia C. Thompson|b. circa 1832|p1392.htm#i139107|||||||

Relationship=7th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Ernest Reuel Conover was born on Oct 3, 1884 at New York. He was the son of Voorhis Charles Conover and Viola Sophia Hanks. Ernest married Frances B. Chestnut on Jul 12, 1911 at Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York.
     
CensusApr 18, 1930Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York
Census-OccApr 18, 1930an asstant general manager for a lighting company

Child of Ernest Reuel Conover and Frances B. Chestnut

Frances B. Chestnut

F, #139111, b. circa 1888
      Frances B. Chestnut was born circa 1888 at New York. Frances married Ernest Reuel Conover, son of Voorhis Charles Conover and Viola Sophia Hanks, on Jul 12, 1911 at Tarrytown, Westchester County, New York.

Child of Frances B. Chestnut and Ernest Reuel Conover

Harmon Conover

M, #139112
Harmon Conover||p1392.htm#i139112|John H. Conover|b. May 25, 1784\nd. Mar 31, 1849|p32.htm#i3134|Margaret Duncan|b. Apr 19, 1780\nd. Jul 29, 1837|p32.htm#i3135|Hermanus Covenhoven|b. Jun 5, 1740\nd. Jan 4, 1804|p12.htm#i1140|Phoebe Bailey|b. Apr 17, 1744\nd. Feb 2, 1832|p32.htm#i3119|||||||

Relationship=2nd cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Harmon Conover was the son of John H. Conover and Margaret Duncan. Harmon married Ellen H. Allen on Nov 2, 1829 at First Presbyterian Church, Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey.
     Harmon Conover was also known as Harmen Conover.

Child of Harmon Conover and Ellen H. Allen

Ellen H. Allen

F, #139113, b. circa 1799
      Ellen H. Allen was born circa 1799 at New Jersey. Ellen married Harmon Conover, son of John H. Conover and Margaret Duncan, on Nov 2, 1829 at First Presbyterian Church, Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey.
CensusJul 30, 1870with her son John, Maple Grove, Hennepin County, New York

Child of Ellen H. Allen and Harmon Conover

John Allen Conover

M, #139114, b. circa 1831
John Allen Conover|b. circa 1831|p1392.htm#i139114|Harmon Conover||p1392.htm#i139112|Ellen H. Allen|b. circa 1799|p1392.htm#i139113|John H. Conover|b. May 25, 1784\nd. Mar 31, 1849|p32.htm#i3134|Margaret Duncan|b. Apr 19, 1780\nd. Jul 29, 1837|p32.htm#i3135|||||||

Relationship=3rd cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      John Allen Conover was born circa 1831 at New Jersey. He was the son of Harmon Conover and Ellen H. Allen. John married Frances Arnell.
CensusJul 30, 1870Maple Grove, Hennepin County, Minnesota
CensusJun 5, 1880Maple Grove, Hennepin County, Minnesota
Census-OccJun 5, 1880a farmer

Children of John Allen Conover and Frances Arnell

Frances Arnell

F, #139115, b. circa 1838
      Frances Arnell was born circa 1838 at New York. Frances married John Allen Conover, son of Harmon Conover and Ellen H. Allen.
     In the census on Jul 30, 1870 Frances Arnell was named Fanny Arnell.
CensusJul 30, 1870Maple Grove, Hennepin County, Minnesota

Children of Frances Arnell and John Allen Conover

John Arnell Conover

M, #139116, b. Sep, 1873
John Arnell Conover|b. Sep, 1873|p1392.htm#i139116|John Allen Conover|b. circa 1831|p1392.htm#i139114|Frances Arnell|b. circa 1838|p1392.htm#i139115|Harmon Conover||p1392.htm#i139112|Ellen H. Allen|b. circa 1799|p1392.htm#i139113|||||||

Relationship=4th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      John Arnell Conover was born in Sep, 1873 at Minnesota. He was the son of John Allen Conover and Frances Arnell. John married Louise Caroline Roth on Apr 14, 1897.
CensusJun 2, 1900Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2 children, 2 living
CensusApr 25, 1910Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, 8 children, 5 living
CensusJan 3, 1920Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota
CensusApr 15, 1930Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota
Census-OccJun 2, 1900a fuel dealer
Census-OccApr 25, 1910the proprietor of a fuel company
Census-OccJan 3, 1920the proprietor of a fuel and transfer company
Census-OccApr 15, 1930the owner of a fuel and transfer company

Children of John Arnell Conover and Louise Caroline Roth

John married Louise Caroline Roth on Apr 14, 1897.

Louise Caroline Roth

F, #139117, b. Aug, 1876
      Louise Caroline Roth was born in Aug, 1876 at Michigan. Louise married John Arnell Conover, son of John Allen Conover and Frances Arnell, on Apr 14, 1897.
CensusJun 2, 1900Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2 children, 2 living
CensusApr 25, 1910Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, 8 children, 5 living
CensusJan 3, 1920Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota
CensusApr 15, 1930Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

Children of Louise Caroline Roth and John Arnell Conover

Stanley Humley Conover

M, #139118, b. circa 1912
Stanley Humley Conover|b. circa 1912|p1392.htm#i139118|John Arnell Conover|b. Sep, 1873|p1392.htm#i139116|Louise Caroline Roth|b. Aug, 1876|p1392.htm#i139117|John A. Conover|b. circa 1831|p1392.htm#i139114|Frances Arnell|b. circa 1838|p1392.htm#i139115|||||||

Relationship=5th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Stanley Humley Conover was born circa 1912 at Minnesota. He was the son of John Arnell Conover and Louise Caroline Roth.

Elias Wyckoff Hummer

M, #139119, b. Nov 22, 1806, d. Sep 28, 1876
Elias Wyckoff Hummer|b. Nov 22, 1806\nd. Sep 28, 1876|p1392.htm#i139119|Adam Hummer|b. Dec 26, 1781\nd. between 1823 and 1872|p1455.htm#i145462|Sarah Wyckoff|b. Feb 3, 1784\nd. Oct 17, 1850|p1455.htm#i145463|||||||||||||
      Elias Wyckoff Hummer was born on Nov 22, 1806 at Flemington, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. He was the son of Adam Hummer and Sarah Wyckoff. Elias married Sarah Ann Conover, daughter of Joseph Conover and Katherine Rebecca Cool, in 1830 at Flemington, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Elias Wyckoff Hummer died on Sep 28, 1876 at Rome Twp., Crawford County, Pennsylvania, at age 69. Elias was buried at Union Cemetery, Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Elias Wyckoff Hummer and Sarah Ann Conover

Elias Lynn Hummer

M, #139120, b. Jul 16, 1847, d. Nov 20, 1923
Elias Lynn Hummer|b. Jul 16, 1847\nd. Nov 20, 1923|p1392.htm#i139120|Elias Wyckoff Hummer|b. Nov 22, 1806\nd. Sep 28, 1876|p1392.htm#i139119|Sarah Ann Conover|b. Nov 9, 1812\nd. Sep 2, 1891|p5.htm#i485|Adam Hummer|b. Dec 26, 1781\nd. between 1823 and 1872|p1455.htm#i145462|Sarah Wyckoff|b. Feb 3, 1784\nd. Oct 17, 1850|p1455.htm#i145463|Joseph Conover|b. Jan 10, 1790\nd. Dec 22, 1858|p5.htm#i483|Katherine R. Cool|b. Jun 23, 1792\nd. Jan 7, 1863|p5.htm#i484|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Elias Lynn Hummer was born on Jul 16, 1847 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Elias Wyckoff Hummer and Sarah Ann Conover. Elias married Angeline Carroll on Feb 18, 1877 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Elias Lynn Hummer died on Nov 20, 1923 at Warren, Warren County, Pennsylvania, at age 76. Elias was buried at Union Cemetery, Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Elias Lynn Hummer and Angeline Carroll

Angeline Carroll

F, #139121, b. Sep 20, 1850, d. Dec 20, 1915
      Angeline Carroll was born on Sep 20, 1850 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Angeline married Elias Lynn Hummer, son of Elias Wyckoff Hummer and Sarah Ann Conover, on Feb 18, 1877 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Angeline Carroll died on Dec 20, 1915 at age 65. Angeline was buried at Union Cemetery, Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.
     She was also known as Angie Carroll.

Children of Angeline Carroll and Elias Lynn Hummer

Petronelle I. Hummer

F, #139122, b. Mar 6, 1881, d. Jan 13, 1977
Petronelle I. Hummer|b. Mar 6, 1881\nd. Jan 13, 1977|p1392.htm#i139122|Elias Lynn Hummer|b. Jul 16, 1847\nd. Nov 20, 1923|p1392.htm#i139120|Angeline Carroll|b. Sep 20, 1850\nd. Dec 20, 1915|p1392.htm#i139121|Elias W. Hummer|b. Nov 22, 1806\nd. Sep 28, 1876|p1392.htm#i139119|Sarah A. Conover|b. Nov 9, 1812\nd. Sep 2, 1891|p5.htm#i485|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Petronelle I. Hummer was born on Mar 6, 1881 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Elias Lynn Hummer and Angeline Carroll. Petronelle married Oscar Hotchkiss Baird on Jun 4, 1907. Petronelle married Oscar Hotchkiss Baird on Jun 4, 1908 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Petronelle I. Hummer died on Jan 13, 1977 at Warren, Warren County, Pennsylvania, at age 95. Petronelle was buried at Union Cemetery, Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Petronelle I. Hummer and Oscar Hotchkiss Baird

Oscar Hotchkiss Baird

M, #139123, b. Nov 3, 1881, d. Nov 4, 1946
      Oscar Hotchkiss Baird was born on Nov 3, 1881 at Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Oscar married Petronelle I. Hummer, daughter of Elias Lynn Hummer and Angeline Carroll, on Jun 4, 1907. Oscar married Petronelle I. Hummer, daughter of Elias Lynn Hummer and Angeline Carroll, on Jun 4, 1908 at Titusville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Oscar Hotchkiss Baird died on Nov 4, 1946 at Warren, Warren County, Pennsylvania, at age 65. Oscar was buried at Miller Station, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Oscar Hotchkiss Baird and Petronelle I. Hummer

John Conover

M, #139128, b. 1810, d. 1871
John Conover|b. 1810\nd. 1871|p1392.htm#i139128|John Conover|b. Jul 4, 1771\nd. Jul 23, 1837|p44.htm#i4340|Eleanor Davis|b. Mar 16, 1777\nd. Apr 24, 1856|p44.htm#i4344|Joseph Couwenhoven|b. Sep 16, 1739\nd. Apr 6, 1814|p44.htm#i4336|Maria Field|b. Jul 17, 1745\nd. Jul 2, 1798|p44.htm#i4337|Peter Davis|b. Jul 7, 1752\nd. Mar 23, 1838|p2504.htm#i250355|Jane Ten Eyck|b. Jun 6, 1756\nd. Feb 8, 1843|p2504.htm#i250356|

Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      John Conover was born in 1810. He was the son of John Conover and Eleanor Davis. John married Jane Elisa Cornell on Feb 10, 1835. John Conover died in 1871.

Child of John Conover and Jane Elisa Cornell

Jane Elisa Cornell

F, #139129
     Jane married John Conover, son of John Conover and Eleanor Davis, on Feb 10, 1835.
     Jane Elisa Cornell was also known as Jane E. Cornell.

Child of Jane Elisa Cornell and John Conover

Col. John Conover

M, #139130, b. Nov 27, 1835, d. Jan 8, 1914
Col. John Conover|b. Nov 27, 1835\nd. Jan 8, 1914|p1392.htm#i139130|John Conover|b. 1810\nd. 1871|p1392.htm#i139128|Jane Elisa Cornell||p1392.htm#i139129|John Conover|b. Jul 4, 1771\nd. Jul 23, 1837|p44.htm#i4340|Eleanor Davis|b. Mar 16, 1777\nd. Apr 24, 1856|p44.htm#i4344|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
Col. John Conover
      Col. John Conover was born on Nov 27, 1835 at near, New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey. He was the son of John Conover and Jane Elisa Cornell. Col. John Conover was born circa 1838 at New Jersey. John married Mary E. Hathaway on Sep 5, 1862 at Douglas County, Kansas. John married Alice Leona Austin, daughter of Homer Austin and Adeline (Unknown), on Apr 10, 1875. Col. John Conover died on Jan 8, 1914 at Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas, at age 78. John was buried at Elmwood Cemetery, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.
     He removed to at Kansas in 1857. He began military service on Aug 28, 1861; Enlisted as a Lieutenant 2nd class Commission in Co A, 8th Kansas Infantry Regiment. He Transfered from Co A to Co F on Dec 12, 1861. He promoted to Full Lieutenant 1st class on Dec 16, 1861. He promoted to full Lieutenant Colonel on Jun 26, 1864. He promoted to full Major on Aug 23, 1864. He transfered from Co A to Co S on Aug 23, 1864. He ended military service on Nov 28, 1865; musterd out Co A, 8th Kansas Infantry Regiment.



COL. JOHN CONOVER. Of the individuals whose lives have influenced, developed, established and broadened the civic and commercial resources of the State of Kansas, one of the most conspicuous was that of the late Col. John Conover. Coming to Kansas in 1857 and locating in Leavenworth, he was one of the pioneer merchants of that city. Going from Kansas at the outbreak of the war into the service of the Union army, he made a brilliant record as a soldier and officer, and that record is one of the many reasons why Kansas people should have a grateful memory of his life. Following the war there came ten years more of successful participation in the business affairs of Leavenworth, at the end of which time he identified himself with Kansas City, Missouri, and there occurred the culminating achievements of his business career, resulting in the founding and development of the Richards & Conover Hardware Company, the largest wholesale house in that line west of St. Louis.

He died January 8, 1914. Before proceeding to the details of his career there should be quoted the summary of his experience which was happily phrased in the editorial columns of the Kansas City Star:

"Colonel John Conover was a typical pioneer of the sort that has conquered the wilderness and made this western country great. A boy whose endowment lacked the glittering non-essentials of wealth and influence, but included the really important qualities that make men count in the world, he hewed his way up from obscurity by industry, energy and intelligence.

"In the war between the states he answered the call of his country and served with distinction. Later he helped to build up an important business which in its half century of existence has become one of the great business enterprises of the country.

"His career was one that people like to regard as exemplifying the possibilities of American life--the career in which the substantial qualities find the door of opportunity open to success."

He was born on a farm near New Brunswick, New Jersey, November 27, 1835. His great-grandfather came to New Jersey from Holland, where the name was spelled Kovenhoven. His son, John, grandfather of Colonel Conover, was a Revolutionary soldier and among other battles he participated at Monmouth, not far from his own home. After the war he settled near New Brunswick and built the house where John Conover, Sr., and Colonel Conover were both born. John Conover, Sr., who was born in 1810, was a farmer until 1841, and then for thirty years was in the service of the Camden & Amboy Railroad Company, being located at Camden for twenty-four years and later at Philadelphia. He died in 1871. His wife was Jane E. Cornell.

The only son of his parents, Col. John Conover attended the public schools of Camden and at the age of sixteen gained his first acquaintance with the hardware trade as clerk in a store. Four years later, in October, 1856, he went west, to Chicago and Quincy, Illinois, and Keokuk, Iowa, and for a time was assistant engineer on a United States dredge boat on the Des Moines River. In the spring of 1857 he took the boat from St. Louis and landed at Leavenworth March 18, 1857. For two months he was employed by the assistant city engineer, then engaged in taking up land claims in Kansas, and in the fall of 1857 became salesman for the Leavenworth hardware firm of Reisinger & Fenlon.

He was called from the routine duties of a store to serve his country as a soldier. July 22, 1861, he became second lieutenant of a company which he organized at Leavenworth for thirty days' service and spent the period stationed at Fort Leavenworth. After being mustered out August 22, 1861, he and other officers recruited a company for three years' service, and on August 28th was mustered in as second lieutenant of Company A, Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry. He became first lieutenant December 12, 1861, and when eighty-three men had been enlisted he was mustered in as captain March 15, 1862. August 23, 1864, he was mustered in as major, was mustered as lieutenant colonel October 21, 1864, was commissioned colonel, though he was not mustered since the regiment was not recruited to the full required strength. However, March 13, 1865, the President of the United States breveted him colonel "for gallant and meritorious service during the war." The regiment had been formed for service in the state and along the border. The company was, therefore, distributed at various posts and with several commands, and Colonel Conover, as a line officer, remained at Fort Leavenworth until February, 1863, in the meantime participating in several expeditions into Missouri against Quantrell's guerillas and during August, 1862, participating in skirmishes with Coffee's, Cockrell's and Quantrell's guerilla bands. In February, 1863, the regiment was ordered to Nashville and placed on provost duty. The regiment was subsequently assigned to the Third Brigade First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and after the twentieth and twenty-first corps were consolidated and made the fourth corps on October 15, 1863, the Eighth Kansas was assigned to the First Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Corps. From August to November, 1865, the regiment did duty in the Department of Texas.

The detailed record of Colonel Conover's service after he left Kansas is summarized as follows: Provost duty at Nashville, Tennessee, until June, 1863; ordered to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, June 9th; Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma campaign June 22d to July 7th; Liberty Gap, June 24th-27th; Chickamauga campaign August 15th to September 22d; Caperton's Ferry near Bridgeport, Alabama, August 29th; Battle of Chickamauga September 19th and 20th; on duty in Chattanooga from September 22d until November 23d; Battle of Chattanooga, including capture of Orchard Knob November 23d, and assault that carried Missionary Ridge, November 25th; November 28th on march to relief of Knoxville; December 8th to February, 1864, campaign in East Tennessee, Strawberry Plains and Dandridge; February 17, 1864, regiment sent to Fort Leavenworth on a veteran furlough and returned to the army April 5th; arriving at Nashville, Eighth Kansas detailed to escort a pontoon train from there to the front June 17th; rejoined brigade at Big Shanty, near Kenesaw Mountain, June 28th; in the operations against Kenesaw July 2d; Ruff's Station, Smyrna Camp Ground July 4th; Chattanooga River July 5th to 17th; Battle of Peach Tree Creek July 19th-20th; Siege of Atlanta July 22d to August 25th; flank movement of Atlanta via East Point August 25th to 30th; engagement at Jonesboro August 31st to September 1st; in line front of Lovejoy Station September 2d to 6th; battle at Lovejoy Station, closing Atlanta campaign, September 6th; Fourth Corps in pursuit of Hood and occupying position at Pulaski, Tennessee, September 29th to October 26th, and from November 1st to 23d; Nashville campaign November and December; Columbia Duck River November 24th to 27th; Spring Hill November 29th; Battle of Franklin November 30th; Battle of Nashville December 15th-16th; pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17th to 28th; march to Huntsville, Alabama, December 31st to January 5, 1865, and on duty there to February 1st; moved to Nashville February 1st, and returned to Huntsville February 8th; on duty to March 15th and then expeditioned to Bull's Gap and operations in East Tennessee, March 15th to April 22d; duty at Nashville to June 24th; move to New Orleans, Louisiana, July 1,1865, and July 10th to Indianola, Texas; march to Green Lake and on duty there to August 10th; move to San Antonio August 10th to 23d and on duty to November 29th; mustered out November 30, 1865; to Fort Leavenworth November 28, 1865, and honorably discharged January 9, 1866.

For nearly 4 1/2 years he had been in the active service of his country. The service was one that strengthened rather than weakened the sterling qualities of his manhood and almost immediately on his return to Leavenworth he became junior partner and acting commercial salesman for the hardware firm of J. F. Richards & Company. In October, 1875, the partners bought the hardware stock of D. A. McKnight of Kansas City, Missouri, and after that Colonel Conover made his home in Kansas City. He took active charge of the Richards & Conover store in 1882, and in that year the Richards & Conover Hardware Company was incorporated. From a small business it grew until Colonel Conover long before his death had the satisfaction of seeing it one of the greatest wholesale houses in the Missouri Valley.

September 5, 1862, during his army service, Colonel Conover married Mary E. Hathaway of Leavenworth. She died September 3, 1866. April 10, 1875, he married Miss Alice Leona Austin. Mrs. Conover was born near Norwalk, Ohio, daughter of Homer and Adeline Austin. There are four children: Leona May, John Austin, Ethel Bird, now deceased, and George R.

While Colonel Conover was an active supporter of the republican party, he never desired to hold office, being content with the service he had rendered as a soldier and the further service he could give as head of a thriving business. He was a Mason, and while not an active member of any church, he believed in and had a deep veneration for Christianity. He was captain of the organization known as Craig's Rifles, of Kansas City, Missouri s was a member of the Kansas Commandery of the Loyal Legion and of the Kansas City Commercial Club and Hardware and Manufacturers Association. He had a wide business and personal acquaintance in the East as well as in the West, and wherever known he was loved for his character as a man and companion and respected because of his superior achievements and his thorough rectitude of character.

Of his objective life as expressed in war and business, no commentary is required beyond the matter of fact record given above. His personal friends came to know and appreciate many of those finer qualities which permeate and give color and tone to personality. Something of this is expressed in the felicitous editorial that appeared in the Kansas City Journal at the time of his death, and which is quoted in part as the conclusion of this article:

"There are now only a pitiful handful of those who may be counted as the real empire makers of the West. Once their rugged faces were met everywhere. Gradually, however, they have relinquished their trust to younger men and the pioneers have fallen one by one before the blasts of time. Colonel Conover was one of the first generation of business men in this part of the West. In his vigorous youth he participated in those splendid activities which wrought out of the desert marvelous development. He lived when men did great deeds, and did them in the course of the day's work. This environment was remarkably congenial to a man of his temperament and enduring physical vitality.

"Until his fatal illness Colonel Conover loved life with a virile enthusiasm seldom met with among those who have lived long and have seen much. Even in his advancing years he took an interest in all that went on about him--and it was the genuine interest felt by men who have played a good part on the stage and held life at its true value. He was especially fond of youth and the ever fresh and effervescent spirit within him always found sympathetic response among the younger generation. His ready and kindly wit, his native sense of humor, his wonderful aptitude in reminiscence and the rich fund of his experience and inclination made him a delightful companion and a happy addition to every gathering. He made it a point to attend veterans' meetings, gatherings of the Loyal Legion, etc., and many times he made pilgrimages to battlefields and other points of historic and patriotic association. His life was full and complete. As a soldier, a business man, a citizen and in his family and social relations he reaped that harvest that is life's best reward--the consciousness of duty well done and the love and respect of all who knew him."

CensusJul 1, 1870In the household of John and Laura Mallory, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, Kansas, real estate value 1,000.00 personal property 5,000.00
No one else is listed
Census1880Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri
CensusJun 7, 1900Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, 4 children, 3 living
Census-OccJul 1, 1870a hardware dealer
Census-OccJun 7, 1900a hardware dealer
Occupation1880hardware whse

Children of Col. John Conover and Alice Leona Austin

John married Alice Leona Austin, daughter of Homer Austin and Adeline (Unknown), on Apr 10, 1875.

Alice Leona Austin

F, #139131, b. Sep, 1847
Alice Leona Austin|b. Sep, 1847|p1392.htm#i139131|Homer Austin||p3032.htm#i303170|Adeline (Unknown)|b. circa 1823|p3032.htm#i303171|||||||||||||
      Alice Leona Austin was born at near, Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio. She was born in Sep, 1847 at Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Homer Austin and Adeline (Unknown). Alice married Col. John Conover, son of John Conover and Jane Elisa Cornell, on Apr 10, 1875.
     Alice Leona Austin was also known as Leona Austin.
Census1880Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri
CensusJun 7, 1900Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, 4 children, 3 living
CensusJan 10, 1920Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, a widow

Children of Alice Leona Austin and Col. John Conover

Alice married Col. John Conover, son of John Conover and Jane Elisa Cornell, on Apr 10, 1875.

Leona May Conover

F, #139132, b. circa 1877
Leona May Conover|b. circa 1877|p1392.htm#i139132|Col. John Conover|b. Nov 27, 1835\nd. Jan 8, 1914|p1392.htm#i139130|Alice Leona Austin|b. Sep, 1847|p1392.htm#i139131|John Conover|b. 1810\nd. 1871|p1392.htm#i139128|Jane E. Cornell||p1392.htm#i139129|Homer Austin||p3032.htm#i303170|Adeline (Unknown)|b. circa 1823|p3032.htm#i303171|

Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Leona May Conover was born circa 1877 at Kansas. She was the daughter of Col. John Conover and Alice Leona Austin. Leona married Hugh Charles Smith on Sep 26, 1899.
Census1880with parents, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri
CensusApr 10, 1910Saint Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, 1 child, 1 living
CensusJan 10, 1920with her mother, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri
Census1930Washington, District of Columbia

Children of Leona May Conover and Hugh Charles Smith

Leona married Hugh Charles Smith on Sep 26, 1899.

Hugh Charles Smith

M, #139133, b. circa 1873
      Hugh Charles Smith was born circa 1873 at Missouri. Hugh married Leona May Conover, daughter of Col. John Conover and Alice Leona Austin, on Sep 26, 1899.
CensusApr 10, 1910Saint Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, 1 child, 1 living
CensusJan 10, 1920with her mother, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri
Census1930Washington, District of Columbia
Census-OccApr 10, 1910a lawyer, general practice
Census-OccJan 10, 1920

Children of Hugh Charles Smith and Leona May Conover

Hugh married Leona May Conover, daughter of Col. John Conover and Alice Leona Austin, on Sep 26, 1899.

Joseph Brown Conover

M, #139134, b. circa 1804
Joseph Brown Conover|b. circa 1804|p1392.htm#i139134|Joseph Conover|b. circa 1775|p44.htm#i4345|Elizabeth Brown||p44.htm#i4346|Joseph Couwenhoven|b. Sep 16, 1739\nd. Apr 6, 1814|p44.htm#i4336|Maria Field|b. Jul 17, 1745\nd. Jul 2, 1798|p44.htm#i4337|||||||

Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Joseph Brown Conover was born circa 1804 at New Jersey. He was the son of Joseph Conover and Elizabeth Brown. Joseph married Mary Adelaide Mercier on Jan 19, 1830 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
CensusJul 25, 1850Locust Ward, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
CensusJul 28, 1860Darby, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, real estate value 50,000, personal property 30,000.00
Census-OccJul 25, 1850a merchant
Census-OccJul 28, 1860a shoe dealer

Children of Joseph Brown Conover and Mary Adelaide Mercier

Joseph married Mary Adelaide Mercier on Jan 19, 1830 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

Mary Adelaide Mercier

F, #139135, b. circa 1809
      Mary Adelaide Mercier was born circa 1809 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Mary married Joseph Brown Conover, son of Joseph Conover and Elizabeth Brown, on Jan 19, 1830 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
     Mary Adelaide Mercier was also known as Mary Ann Adelaide Mercier. She was also known as Mary Adelaide Mercur.
CensusJul 25, 1850Locust Ward, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
CensusJul 28, 1860Darby, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, real estate value 50,000, personal property 30,000.00

Children of Mary Adelaide Mercier and Joseph Brown Conover

William Pidgeon Conover

M, #139136, b. Apr 30, 1841, d. Sep 6, 1911
William Pidgeon Conover|b. Apr 30, 1841\nd. Sep 6, 1911|p1392.htm#i139136|Joseph Brown Conover|b. circa 1804|p1392.htm#i139134|Mary Adelaide Mercier|b. circa 1809|p1392.htm#i139135|Joseph Conover|b. circa 1775|p44.htm#i4345|Elizabeth Brown||p44.htm#i4346|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      William Pidgeon Conover was born on Apr 30, 1841 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joseph Brown Conover and Mary Adelaide Mercier. William married Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn, daughter of John William Claghorn, on Apr 28, 1864. William Pidgeon Conover died on Sep 6, 1911 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, at age 70.

Children of William Pidgeon Conover and Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn

Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn

F, #139137, b. Aug 23, 1839
Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn|b. Aug 23, 1839|p1392.htm#i139137|John William Claghorn||p3078.htm#i307722||||||||||||||||
      Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn was born on Aug 23, 1839. She was the daughter of John William Claghorn. Sarah married William Pidgeon Conover, son of Joseph Brown Conover and Mary Adelaide Mercier, on Apr 28, 1864.

Children of Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn and William Pidgeon Conover

Mary Adelaide Conover

F, #139138, b. Oct 5, 1871
Mary Adelaide Conover|b. Oct 5, 1871|p1392.htm#i139138|William Pidgeon Conover|b. Apr 30, 1841\nd. Sep 6, 1911|p1392.htm#i139136|Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn|b. Aug 23, 1839|p1392.htm#i139137|Joseph B. Conover|b. circa 1804|p1392.htm#i139134|Mary A. Mercier|b. circa 1809|p1392.htm#i139135|John W. Claghorn||p3078.htm#i307722||||

Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Mary Adelaide Conover was born on Oct 5, 1871. She was the daughter of William Pidgeon Conover and Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn. Mary married Alexander James Mac Lean on Jun 6, 1900. Mary married Robert Alexander Neely on Mar 20, 1939.

Alexander James Mac Lean

M, #139139
     Alexander married Mary Adelaide Conover, daughter of William Pidgeon Conover and Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn, on Jun 6, 1900.

Robert Alexander Neely

M, #139140
     Robert married Mary Adelaide Conover, daughter of William Pidgeon Conover and Sarah Elizabeth Claghorn, on Mar 20, 1939.

Lewis Mason Conover

M, #139141, b. Apr 26, 1866, d. Feb 10, 1940
Lewis Mason Conover|b. Apr 26, 1866\nd. Feb 10, 1940|p1392.htm#i139141|Joseph Adams Conover|b. 1830\nd. Mar 26, 1900|p1515.htm#i151483|Elizabeth Delancey Price|b. May 11, 1838\nd. Feb 24, 1916|p1515.htm#i151484|John Conover|b. Feb 14, 1808\nd. Jan 31, 1877|p180.htm#i17911|Mary Adams|b. Aug 18, 1813\nd. Apr 7, 1847|p180.htm#i17912|||||||

Relationship=7th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Lewis Mason Conover was born on Apr 26, 1866 at Absecon, Atlantic County, New Jersey. He was the son of Joseph Adams Conover and Elizabeth Delancey Price. Lewis married Sarah Weisenthal circa 1888. Lewis Mason Conover died on Feb 10, 1940 at Atlantic County, New Jersey, at age 73.
CensusJun 7, 1900Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, 3 children, 3 living
CensusApr 16, 1910Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, 4 children, 4 living
Census-OccJun 7, 1900a printer
Census-OccApr 16, 1910a printer

Children of Lewis Mason Conover and Sarah Weisenthal

Lewis married Sarah Weisenthal circa 1888.

Sarah Weisenthal

F, #139142, b. circa Sep, 1869
      Sarah Weisenthal was born circa Sep, 1869 at New Jersey. Sarah married Lewis Mason Conover, son of Joseph Adams Conover and Elizabeth Delancey Price, circa 1888.
CensusJun 7, 1900Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, 3 children, 3 living
CensusApr 16, 1910Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, 4 children, 4 living

Children of Sarah Weisenthal and Lewis Mason Conover

Henrietta Conover

F, #139143, b. circa Aug, 1892
Henrietta Conover|b. circa Aug, 1892|p1392.htm#i139143|Lewis Mason Conover|b. Apr 26, 1866\nd. Feb 10, 1940|p1392.htm#i139141|Sarah Weisenthal|b. circa Sep, 1869|p1392.htm#i139142|Joseph A. Conover|b. 1830\nd. Mar 26, 1900|p1515.htm#i151483|Elizabeth D. Price|b. May 11, 1838\nd. Feb 24, 1916|p1515.htm#i151484|||||||

Relationship=8th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Henrietta Conover was born circa Aug, 1892 at New Jersey. She was the daughter of Lewis Mason Conover and Sarah Weisenthal. Henrietta Conover was born circa 1903 at New Jersey. Henrietta married W. Warren Shantz on Aug 17, 1929.
CensusApr 19, 1930Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

W. Warren Shantz

M, #139144, b. circa 1901
      W. Warren Shantz was born circa 1901 at Pennsylvania. W. married Henrietta Conover, daughter of Lewis Mason Conover and Sarah Weisenthal, on Aug 17, 1929.
CensusApr 19, 1930Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania
Census-OccApr 19, 1930a grocery clerk

Annetje Van Dyck

F, #139145, b. Jul 26, 1688, d. Jun 30, 1760
Annetje Van Dyck|b. Jul 26, 1688\nd. Jun 30, 1760|p1392.htm#i139145|Achias Van Dyke|d. circa 1707|p958.htm#i95707|Jannetie Lamberts||p958.htm#i95708|||||||||||||
     Annetje Van Dyck was baptized on Jul 26, 1688 at Dutch Reformed Church, New York City, New York County, New York. She was the daughter of Achias Van Dyke and Jannetie Lamberts. Annetje married Coert Voorhees, son of Albert Coerte Van Voorhees and Sara Willemse Cornel, circa 1715. Annetje Van Dyck died on Jun 30, 1760 at age 71.
     She and Coert Voorhees resided at at Harlingen, Somerset County, New Jersey, circa 1731.

Children of Annetje Van Dyck and Coert Voorhees

Maia De Baugh

F, #139147
     Maia married Zacheus Voorhees, son of Albert Coerte Van Voorhees and Willemtje Suydam, circa 1743.
     Maia De Baugh was also known as Maria Debaugh.

Children of Maia De Baugh and Zacheus Voorhees

Annatie Van Voorhees

F, #139148, b. Feb 20, 1761, d. Jan 11, 1852
Annatie Van Voorhees|b. Feb 20, 1761\nd. Jan 11, 1852|p1392.htm#i139148|Zacheus Voorhees|b. circa 1720|p257.htm#i25618|Maia De Baugh||p1392.htm#i139147|Albert C. Van Voorhees|b. circa 1673\nd. circa 1748|p10.htm#i948|Willemtje Suydam|b. 1669|p10.htm#i950|||||||

Relationship=3rd cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=3rd great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Annatie Van Voorhees was born on Feb 20, 1761. She was the daughter of Zacheus Voorhees and Maia De Baugh. Annatie Van Voorhees was baptized on Mar 22, 1761 at Dutch Reformed Church, Harlingen, Somerset County, New Jersey. She and James Bergen obtained a marriage license on May 15, 1779. Annatie married James Bergen, son of Evert Bergen and Jane Hegeman, on May 20, 1779. Annatie Van Voorhees died on Jan 11, 1852 at age 90.
     She was also known as Ann Van Voorhees. She was also known as Annetje Voorhees. She was also known as Annache Van Voorhees.

Children of Annatie Van Voorhees and James Bergen

She and James Bergen obtained a marriage license on May 15, 1779. Annatie married James Bergen, son of Evert Bergen and Jane Hegeman, on May 20, 1779.

James Bergen

M, #139149, b. Sep 11, 1755, d. Jan 30, 1830
James Bergen|b. Sep 11, 1755\nd. Jan 30, 1830|p1392.htm#i139149|Evert Bergen|b. 1717\nd. Nov 17, 1776|p1435.htm#i143475|Jane Hegeman|b. circa 1725|p1435.htm#i143476|||||||||||||
      James Bergen was born on Sep 11, 1755. He was the son of Evert Bergen and Jane Hegeman. James Bergen and Annatie Van Voorhees obtained a marriage license on May 15, 1779. James married Annatie Van Voorhees, daughter of Zacheus Voorhees and Maia De Baugh, on May 20, 1779. James Bergen died on Jan 30, 1830 at age 74.

Children of James Bergen and Annatie Van Voorhees

Jane Bergen

F, #139150, b. Apr 12, 1797
Jane Bergen|b. Apr 12, 1797|p1392.htm#i139150|James Bergen|b. Sep 11, 1755\nd. Jan 30, 1830|p1392.htm#i139149|Annatie Van Voorhees|b. Feb 20, 1761\nd. Jan 11, 1852|p1392.htm#i139148|Evert Bergen|b. 1717\nd. Nov 17, 1776|p1435.htm#i143475|Jane Hegeman|b. circa 1725|p1435.htm#i143476|Zacheus Voorhees|b. circa 1720|p257.htm#i25618|Maia De Baugh||p1392.htm#i139147|

Relationship=4th cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=4th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Jane Bergen was born on Apr 12, 1797. She was the daughter of James Bergen and Annatie Van Voorhees. Jane married William M. Wilson on Oct 4, 1817.

Child of Jane Bergen and William M. Wilson

William M. Wilson

M, #139151
     William married Jane Bergen, daughter of James Bergen and Annatie Van Voorhees, on Oct 4, 1817.

Child of William M. Wilson and Jane Bergen

Mineard William Wilson

M, #139152
Mineard William Wilson||p1392.htm#i139152|William M. Wilson||p1392.htm#i139151|Jane Bergen|b. Apr 12, 1797|p1392.htm#i139150|||||||James Bergen|b. Sep 11, 1755\nd. Jan 30, 1830|p1392.htm#i139149|Annatie Van Voorhees|b. Feb 20, 1761\nd. Jan 11, 1852|p1392.htm#i139148|

Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Mineard William Wilson was the son of William M. Wilson and Jane Bergen. Mineard married Elizabeth White on Jul 13, 1841.

Child of Mineard William Wilson and Elizabeth White

Elizabeth White

F, #139153
     Elizabeth married Mineard William Wilson, son of William M. Wilson and Jane Bergen, on Jul 13, 1841.

Child of Elizabeth White and Mineard William Wilson

Minard Alexander Wilson

M, #139154
Minard Alexander Wilson||p1392.htm#i139154|Mineard William Wilson||p1392.htm#i139152|Elizabeth White||p1392.htm#i139153|William M. Wilson||p1392.htm#i139151|Jane Bergen|b. Apr 12, 1797|p1392.htm#i139150|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Minard Alexander Wilson was the son of Mineard William Wilson and Elizabeth White. Minard married Cornelia Hand Chatterton on Nov 7, 1877.

Child of Minard Alexander Wilson and Cornelia Hand Chatterton

Cornelia Hand Chatterton

F, #139155
     Cornelia married Minard Alexander Wilson, son of Mineard William Wilson and Elizabeth White, on Nov 7, 1877.

Child of Cornelia Hand Chatterton and Minard Alexander Wilson

Sarah Jane Wilson

F, #139156
Sarah Jane Wilson||p1392.htm#i139156|Minard Alexander Wilson||p1392.htm#i139154|Cornelia Hand Chatterton||p1392.htm#i139155|Mineard W. Wilson||p1392.htm#i139152|Elizabeth White||p1392.htm#i139153|||||||

Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Sarah Jane Wilson was the daughter of Minard Alexander Wilson and Cornelia Hand Chatterton. Sarah married William P. Allen on Jan 10, 1923.

William P. Allen

M, #139157
     William married Sarah Jane Wilson, daughter of Minard Alexander Wilson and Cornelia Hand Chatterton, on Jan 10, 1923.

Sara Isabel Covenhoven

F, #139158
Sara Isabel Covenhoven||p1392.htm#i139158|James Thomas Covenhoven|b. Aug 27, 1813\nd. Jun 15, 1879|p1187.htm#i118617|Sarah I. Basler||p1187.htm#i118618|James Covenhoven|b. May 20, 1793\nd. Sep 4, 1865|p1186.htm#i118563|Elizabeth Bagley|b. Mar 20, 1794\nd. Jul 30, 1854|p1186.htm#i118579|||||||

Relationship=8th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Sara Isabel Covenhoven was the daughter of James Thomas Covenhoven and Sarah I. Basler. Sara married Joshua Collins before 1872.
     Sara Isabel Covenhoven was also known as Isabel Cowenhoven.

Child of Sara Isabel Covenhoven and Joshua Collins

Joshua Collins

M, #139159
     Joshua married Sara Isabel Covenhoven, daughter of James Thomas Covenhoven and Sarah I. Basler, before 1872.

Child of Joshua Collins and Sara Isabel Covenhoven

Annabel Collins

F, #139160, b. Mar 11, 1873
Annabel Collins|b. Mar 11, 1873|p1392.htm#i139160|Joshua Collins||p1392.htm#i139159|Sara Isabel Covenhoven||p1392.htm#i139158|||||||James T. Covenhoven|b. Aug 27, 1813\nd. Jun 15, 1879|p1187.htm#i118617|Sarah I. Basler||p1187.htm#i118618|

Relationship=9th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Annabel Collins was born on Mar 11, 1873 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Joshua Collins and Sara Isabel Covenhoven. Annabel married William Tatnal Coe, son of Sylvester Coe and Ann Rowlands, on Sep 24, 1897. Annabel married William Tatnal Coe, son of Sylvester Coe and Ann Rowlands, on Sep 28, 1898 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Children of Annabel Collins and William Tatnal Coe

William Tatnal Coe

M, #139161, b. May 18, 1879
William Tatnal Coe|b. May 18, 1879|p1392.htm#i139161|Sylvester Coe||p3181.htm#i318022|Ann Rowlands||p3181.htm#i318023|||||||||||||
      William Tatnal Coe was born on May 18, 1879. He was the son of Sylvester Coe and Ann Rowlands. William married Annabel Collins, daughter of Joshua Collins and Sara Isabel Covenhoven, on Sep 24, 1897. William married Annabel Collins, daughter of Joshua Collins and Sara Isabel Covenhoven, on Sep 28, 1898 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Children of William Tatnal Coe and Annabel Collins

Isabel Van Couenhoven Coe

F, #139162, b. Jun 29, 1901
Isabel Van Couenhoven Coe|b. Jun 29, 1901|p1392.htm#i139162|William Tatnal Coe|b. May 18, 1879|p1392.htm#i139161|Annabel Collins|b. Mar 11, 1873|p1392.htm#i139160|Sylvester Coe||p3181.htm#i318022|Ann Rowlands||p3181.htm#i318023|Joshua Collins||p1392.htm#i139159|Sara I. Covenhoven||p1392.htm#i139158|

Relationship=10th cousin of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Isabel Van Couenhoven Coe was born on Jun 29, 1901. She was the daughter of William Tatnal Coe and Annabel Collins.

Isaac Monfore

M, #139163, b. Sep 14, 1803, d. Apr 30, 1871
Isaac Monfore|b. Sep 14, 1803\nd. Apr 30, 1871|p1392.htm#i139163|Peter Montfort|b. Sep 9, 1757\nd. Jul 24, 1829|p15.htm#i1427|Aeltje Covenhoven|b. Jun 27, 1758 or 1759\nd. Aug 20, 1824|p15.htm#i1426|Abraham Monfort|b. Feb 8, 1730\nd. Aug, 1789|p187.htm#i18607|Nelly Voorhees|b. circa 1742\nd. after May, 1804|p1017.htm#i101669|Garret Covenhoven|b. Mar 18, 1723|p15.htm#i1414|Sarah Traphagen|b. Jun 19, 1729|p15.htm#i1415|

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Isaac Monfore was born on Sep 14, 1803 at Delaware County, New York. He was the son of Peter Montfort and Aeltje Covenhoven. Isaac married Mary Douglass Curtis, daughter of Jeremiah Curtis and Mercy Ewell, on Jul 15, 1836 at Sheby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan. Isaac Monfore died on Apr 30, 1871 at Disco, Macomb County, Michigan, at age 67.
     He removed to at Macomb County, Michigan, in 1828.
CensusJun 1, 1870Shelby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan, real estate value 20,000.00, personal property 600.00
Census-OccJun 1, 1870a farmer

Children of Isaac Monfore and Mary Douglass Curtis

Isaac married Mary Douglass Curtis, daughter of Jeremiah Curtis and Mercy Ewell, on Jul 15, 1836 at Sheby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan.

Mary Douglass Curtis

F, #139164, b. May 30, 1818, d. May 7, 1906
Mary Douglass Curtis|b. May 30, 1818\nd. May 7, 1906|p1392.htm#i139164|Jeremiah Curtis||p4340.htm#i433979|Mercy Ewell||p4340.htm#i433980|||||||||||||
      Mary Douglass Curtis was born on May 30, 1818 at Middlebury, Wyoming County, New York. She was the daughter of Jeremiah Curtis and Mercy Ewell. Mary married Isaac Monfore, son of Peter Montfort and Aeltje Covenhoven, on Jul 15, 1836 at Sheby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan. Mary Douglass Curtis died on May 7, 1906 at Sheby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan, at age 87.
CensusJun 1, 1870Shelby Twp., Macomb County, Michigan, real estate value 20,000.00, personal property 600.00

Children of Mary Douglass Curtis and Isaac Monfore

Issac Newton Monfort

M, #139165, b. circa 1845
Issac Newton Monfort|b. circa 1845|p1392.htm#i139165|Isaac Monfore|b. Sep 14, 1803\nd. Apr 30, 1871|p1392.htm#i139163|Mary Douglass Curtis|b. May 30, 1818\nd. May 7, 1906|p1392.htm#i139164|Peter Montfort|b. Sep 9, 1757\nd. Jul 24, 1829|p15.htm#i1427|Aeltje Covenhoven|b. Jun 27, 1758 or 1759\nd. Aug 20, 1824|p15.htm#i1426|Jeremiah Curtis||p4340.htm#i433979|Mercy Ewell||p4340.htm#i433980|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Issac Newton Monfort was born circa 1845 at Michigan. He was the son of Isaac Monfore and Mary Douglass Curtis. Issac married Effie Lillian Brooks on Jul 18, 1871.

Child of Issac Newton Monfort and Effie Lillian Brooks

Effie Lillian Brooks

F, #139166
     Effie married Issac Newton Monfort, son of Isaac Monfore and Mary Douglass Curtis, on Jul 18, 1871.

Child of Effie Lillian Brooks and Issac Newton Monfort

Willard Monfort

M, #139167
Willard Monfort||p1392.htm#i139167|Issac Newton Monfort|b. circa 1845|p1392.htm#i139165|Effie Lillian Brooks||p1392.htm#i139166|Isaac Monfore|b. Sep 14, 1803\nd. Apr 30, 1871|p1392.htm#i139163|Mary D. Curtis|b. May 30, 1818\nd. May 7, 1906|p1392.htm#i139164|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Willard Monfort was the son of Issac Newton Monfort and Effie Lillian Brooks. Willard married mabel Evangeline Wilders on Jun 12, 1901.

mabel Evangeline Wilders

F, #139168
     Mabel married Willard Monfort, son of Issac Newton Monfort and Effie Lillian Brooks, on Jun 12, 1901.

Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson

F, #139169, b. Feb 8, 1790
Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson|b. Feb 8, 1790|p1392.htm#i139169|James Hankinson|b. Jan 15, 1763\nd. Nov 15, 1813|p35.htm#i3480|Sarah Dunham|b. Aug 27, 1765\nd. Mar 24, 1808|p35.htm#i3481|Capt. Kenneth Hankinson|b. Jan 24, 1731/32\nd. Oct 6, 1807|p35.htm#i3470|Supposed daughter of William Couwenhoven and Margaretta Schenck Nelly Covenhoven|b. Mar 12, 1738\nd. Jul 19, 1802|p35.htm#i3469|Col. Azariah Dunham||p3580.htm#i357905|Mary Ford||p3580.htm#i357906|

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson was born on Feb 8, 1790. She was the daughter of James Hankinson and Sarah Dunham. Eliza married James Hugh Newell, son of Hugh Newell and Elizabeth Truex, on Jan 25, 1815.

Children of Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson and James Hugh Newell

James Hugh Newell

M, #139170
James Hugh Newell||p1392.htm#i139170|Hugh Newell|b. 1743\nd. 1816|p1856.htm#i185551|Elizabeth Truex|b. Nov 1, 1738|p1860.htm#i185947|||||||||||||
     James Hugh Newell was the son of Hugh Newell and Elizabeth Truex. James married Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson, daughter of James Hankinson and Sarah Dunham, on Jan 25, 1815.

Azariah Dunham Newell

M, #139171
Azariah Dunham Newell||p1392.htm#i139171|James Hugh Newell||p1392.htm#i139170|Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson|b. Feb 8, 1790|p1392.htm#i139169|Hugh Newell|b. 1743\nd. 1816|p1856.htm#i185551|Elizabeth Truex|b. Nov 1, 1738|p1860.htm#i185947|James Hankinson|b. Jan 15, 1763\nd. Nov 15, 1813|p35.htm#i3480|Sarah Dunham|b. Aug 27, 1765\nd. Mar 24, 1808|p35.htm#i3481|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Azariah Dunham Newell was the son of James Hugh Newell and Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson. Azariah married Elizabeth McIntyre on Sep 1, 1858.

Child of Azariah Dunham Newell and Elizabeth McIntyre

Elizabeth McIntyre

F, #139172
     Elizabeth married Azariah Dunham Newell, son of James Hugh Newell and Eliza Dessausaure Hankinson, on Sep 1, 1858.

Child of Elizabeth McIntyre and Azariah Dunham Newell

Adelaide Dessausaure Newell

F, #139173
Adelaide Dessausaure Newell||p1392.htm#i139173|Azariah Dunham Newell||p1392.htm#i139171|Elizabeth McIntyre||p1392.htm#i139172|James H. Newell||p1392.htm#i139170|Eliza D. Hankinson|b. Feb 8, 1790|p1392.htm#i139169|||||||

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Adelaide Dessausaure Newell was the daughter of Azariah Dunham Newell and Elizabeth McIntyre. Adelaide married William Swain Meek on Oct 11, 1888.

William Swain Meek

M, #139174
     William married Adelaide Dessausaure Newell, daughter of Azariah Dunham Newell and Elizabeth McIntyre, on Oct 11, 1888.

William Conover

M, #139175, b. circa 1819
William Conover|b. circa 1819|p1392.htm#i139175|Cornelius Conover|b. Jul 10, 1778\nd. Jul 31, 1838|p32.htm#i3157|Margaret Bowers|b. circa 1780\nd. Feb 20, 1862|p32.htm#i3158|William Covenhoven|b. Jun 23, 1738\nd. Mar 15, 1815|p4.htm#i372|Catherine Dey|b. after 1730\nd. before 1791|p32.htm#i3145|||||||

Relationship=2nd cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      William Conover was born circa 1819 at New York. He was the son of Cornelius Conover and Margaret Bowers. William married Rebecca Jane Van Vechten on Feb 15, 1844.
CensusSep 11, 1850Victor, Ontario County, New York
OccupationSep 11, 1850a farmer

Children of William Conover and Rebecca Jane Van Vechten

Rebecca Jane Van Vechten

F, #139176, b. circa 1822
      Rebecca Jane Van Vechten was born circa 1822 at New York. Rebecca married William Conover, son of Cornelius Conover and Margaret Bowers, on Feb 15, 1844.
CensusSep 11, 1850Victor, Ontario County, New York

Children of Rebecca Jane Van Vechten and William Conover

Mary Emeroy Conover

F, #139177, b. circa 1847
Mary Emeroy Conover|b. circa 1847|p1392.htm#i139177|William Conover|b. circa 1819|p1392.htm#i139175|Rebecca Jane Van Vechten|b. circa 1822|p1392.htm#i139176|Cornelius Conover|b. Jul 10, 1778\nd. Jul 31, 1838|p32.htm#i3157|Margaret Bowers|b. circa 1780\nd. Feb 20, 1862|p32.htm#i3158|||||||

Relationship=3rd cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Mary Emeroy Conover was born circa 1847 at New York. She was the daughter of William Conover and Rebecca Jane Van Vechten. Mary married Theodore Sidell on Jan 11, 1871.

Child of Mary Emeroy Conover and Theodore Sidell

Theodore Sidell

M, #139178
     Theodore married Mary Emeroy Conover, daughter of William Conover and Rebecca Jane Van Vechten, on Jan 11, 1871.

Child of Theodore Sidell and Mary Emeroy Conover

Jennie M. Sidell

F, #139179
Jennie M. Sidell||p1392.htm#i139179|Theodore Sidell||p1392.htm#i139178|Mary Emeroy Conover|b. circa 1847|p1392.htm#i139177|||||||William Conover|b. circa 1819|p1392.htm#i139175|Rebecca J. Van Vechten|b. circa 1822|p1392.htm#i139176|

Relationship=4th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Jennie M. Sidell was the daughter of Theodore Sidell and Mary Emeroy Conover. Jennie married Charles E. Padelford on Aug 19, 1896.

Charles E. Padelford

M, #139180
     Charles married Jennie M. Sidell, daughter of Theodore Sidell and Mary Emeroy Conover, on Aug 19, 1896.

David Rodenbaugh Conover

M, #139181, b. Nov 18, 1787, d. Jun 21, 1842
David Rodenbaugh Conover|b. Nov 18, 1787\nd. Jun 21, 1842|p1392.htm#i139181|Roelof Covenhoven|b. circa 1760\nd. 1824|p15.htm#i1428|Sarah Van Sicklin|b. 1766\nd. 1801|p15.htm#i1429|Garret Covenhoven|b. Mar 18, 1723|p15.htm#i1414|Sarah Traphagen|b. Jun 19, 1729|p15.htm#i1415|||||||

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      David Rodenbaugh Conover was born on Nov 18, 1787 at New Jersey. He was the son of Roelof Covenhoven and Sarah Van Sicklin. David married Mary Hays on Mar 4, 1813. David Rodenbaugh Conover died on Jun 21, 1842 at New Jersey at age 54.

Children of David Rodenbaugh Conover and Mary Hays

Mary Hays

F, #139182
     Mary married David Rodenbaugh Conover, son of Roelof Covenhoven and Sarah Van Sicklin, on Mar 4, 1813.
     Mary Hays was also known as Mary Hass.

Children of Mary Hays and David Rodenbaugh Conover

Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover

M, #139183, b. circa 1825, d. 1905
Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover|b. circa 1825\nd. 1905|p1392.htm#i139183|David Rodenbaugh Conover|b. Nov 18, 1787\nd. Jun 21, 1842|p1392.htm#i139181|Mary Hays||p1392.htm#i139182|Roelof Covenhoven|b. circa 1760\nd. 1824|p15.htm#i1428|Sarah Van Sicklin|b. 1766\nd. 1801|p15.htm#i1429|||||||

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover was born circa 1825 at New Jersey. He was the son of David Rodenbaugh Conover and Mary Hays. Herbert married Ellen Hoffman, daughter of Peter F. Hoffman and Anna Philhower. Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover died in 1905. Herbert was buried at Fairmont Cemetery, Fairmont, Hunterdon County, New Jersey.
CensusJun 1, 1860Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, personal property 500.00
CensusAug 19, 1870Tewkesbury Twp., Hunterdon County, New Jersey, real estate value 4,500.00, personal property 4,400.00
Census-OccJun 1, 1860a farmer
Census-OccAug 19, 1870a farmer

Children of Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover and Ellen Hoffman

Herbert married Ellen Hoffman, daughter of Peter F. Hoffman and Anna Philhower.

Ellen Hoffman

F, #139184, b. circa 1825, d. 1875
Ellen Hoffman|b. circa 1825\nd. 1875|p1392.htm#i139184|Peter F. Hoffman|b. 1792\nd. Jul 26, 1876|p4102.htm#i410195|Anna Philhower||p4102.htm#i410196|||||||||||||
      Ellen Hoffman was born circa 1825 at New Jersey. She was the daughter of Peter F. Hoffman and Anna Philhower. Ellen married Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover, son of David Rodenbaugh Conover and Mary Hays. Ellen Hoffman died in 1875. Ellen was buried at Fairmont Cemetery, Fairmont, Hunterdon County, New Jersey.
CensusJun 1, 1860Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, personal property 500.00
CensusAug 19, 1870Tewkesbury Twp., Hunterdon County, New Jersey, real estate value 4,500.00, personal property 4,400.00

Children of Ellen Hoffman and Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover

George E. Conover

M, #139185, b. circa 1864
George E. Conover|b. circa 1864|p1392.htm#i139185|Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover|b. circa 1825\nd. 1905|p1392.htm#i139183|Ellen Hoffman|b. circa 1825\nd. 1875|p1392.htm#i139184|David R. Conover|b. Nov 18, 1787\nd. Jun 21, 1842|p1392.htm#i139181|Mary Hays||p1392.htm#i139182|Peter F. Hoffman|b. 1792\nd. Jul 26, 1876|p4102.htm#i410195|Anna Philhower||p4102.htm#i410196|

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      George E. Conover was born circa 1864 at New Jersey. He was the son of Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover and Ellen Hoffman. George married Harriet Chapman on Nov 26, 1885.

Child of George E. Conover and Harriet Chapman

Harriet Chapman

F, #139186
     Harriet married George E. Conover, son of Herbert Rodenbaugh Conover and Ellen Hoffman, on Nov 26, 1885.

Child of Harriet Chapman and George E. Conover

Herbert Thornton Conover

M, #139187
Herbert Thornton Conover||p1392.htm#i139187|George E. Conover|b. circa 1864|p1392.htm#i139185|Harriet Chapman||p1392.htm#i139186|Herbert R. Conover|b. circa 1825\nd. 1905|p1392.htm#i139183|Ellen Hoffman|b. circa 1825\nd. 1875|p1392.htm#i139184|||||||

Relationship=7th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Herbert Thornton Conover was the son of George E. Conover and Harriet Chapman. Herbert married Viola Sheets on Oct 29, 1912.

Viola Sheets

F, #139188
     Viola married Herbert Thornton Conover, son of George E. Conover and Harriet Chapman, on Oct 29, 1912.

Sarah Wyckoff

F, #139189, b. Jan 24, 1730, d. Aug 30, 1807
Sarah Wyckoff|b. Jan 24, 1730\nd. Aug 30, 1807|p1392.htm#i139189|Nicholas Wyckoff|b. Nov 1, 1699\nd. 1778|p815.htm#i81427|Elizabeth Delgyn|b. Aug 6, 1704|p1790.htm#i178902|Pieter Wyckoff|b. circa 1675\nd. 1759|p21.htm#i2053|Willemtje J. Schenck|b. 1677|p21.htm#i2054|||||||
      Sarah Wyckoff was born on Jan 24, 1728 at Readington, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. She was born on Jan 24, 1730. She was the daughter of Nicholas Wyckoff and Elizabeth Delgyn. Sarah married Albert Covenhoven, son of Roelof Covenhoven and Annetje Strycker, before 1755. Sarah Wyckoff died on Aug 30, 1807 at Muncy Twp., Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, at age 77.
     She was also known as Grietje Wyckoff.

Children of Sarah Wyckoff and Albert Covenhoven

Robert Covenhoven

M, #139190, b. Dec 7, 1755, d. Oct 29, 1846
Robert Covenhoven|b. Dec 7, 1755\nd. Oct 29, 1846|p1392.htm#i139190|Albert Covenhoven|b. Oct 24, 1731\nd. between 1778 and 1779|p26.htm#i2575|Sarah Wyckoff|b. Jan 24, 1730\nd. Aug 30, 1807|p1392.htm#i139189|Roelof Covenhoven|b. Sep 8, 1703|p5.htm#i443|Annetje Strycker|b. Dec 20, 1708|p12.htm#i1129|Nicholas Wyckoff|b. Nov 1, 1699\nd. 1778|p815.htm#i81427|Elizabeth Delgyn|b. Aug 6, 1704|p1790.htm#i178902|

Relationship=3rd cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=4th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
Robert Covenhoven
      Robert Covenhoven was born on Dec 7, 1755 at Monmouth County, New Jersey. He was the son of Albert Covenhoven and Sarah Wyckoff. Robert married Mercy Kelsey Cutter on Feb 22, 1778. Robert Covenhoven died on Oct 29, 1845 at Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, at age 89. He died on Oct 29, 1846 at Mifflin, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, at age 90. Robert was buried at Riverview Cemetery, Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania.
     He was also known as Robert Crownover. He served as a scout and guide. In 1776 he joined the army under Washington and fought at Trenton and Princeton in Capt. Cookson Long's Company, Col. James Potters regiment, Northumberland County Militia.
Robert's left a will on Mar 27, 1843.

History of Lycoming County, Pennsylvanisa. Edited by John F. Meginness, Chicago, Ill. brown, Runk & Co., Publishers 1892 Pages 117, 118, 119, 241
"Robert became distinguished as a guide, spy, and Indian killer. Soon after coming to the valley Albert Covenhoven lost all his effects by a sudden freshet in the creek, and the family were reduced to great distress. On the breaking out of the Revolution, Robert joined the Continental army, but late in 1777 he returned home on account of the expiration of his enlistment and at once took an active part in aiding to protect the frontier. The neigbors of the Covenhovens were the Thomsons, Wychoffs, Van Camps, Van Nests, etc. All of these, save the first mentioned, were of Hollandish descent."
Otzinachson: A History of the West Branch Valley by J. F. Meginness, (John of Lancaster) A Reprint of the 1889 Edition Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore 1991 "Late in the year 1777, Robert Covenhoven returned to the West Branch from the Continental army, his term of enlistment having expired. His extensive knowledge of the country, the character, habits, and disposition of the Indians, acquired whilst serving with surveying parties, was of great service, and he was disposed to make good use of it for the benefit of the settlement. An old man named Wyckoff, who appears to have been an uncle to the Covenhovens, also settled about Loyalsock. He was a tanner by trade and soon erected a rude tannery and commenced making leather for the settlement. One day in the summer of 1778, the Covenhoven boys were mowing in a meadow and the old man Wyckoff was at work in his tannery. A dog suddenly commenced barking and exhibited great symptoms of alarm; he would run towards the woods, snuff the air, and return. The boys were satisfied that Indians were lurking near. They took their rifles and warned the old man to leave; this he at first refused to do, alleging that there was no danger. They finally induced him to go with them; they had not proceeded far till one of them hissed the dog when he bounded into the bushes and seized an Indian by the leg where he was lying concealed. He rose immediately and shot the faithful animal. The whites, who were in all six in number, immediately jumped to trees--the Indians did the same and firing commenced. Wyckoff, who was very much humpbacked, got behind a tree that was too small to hide all of his person. Fortunately for him, another small tree stood between him and the Indians, as they fired at him,their bullets struck this tree and made the bark fly around Robert Covenhoven,who was near. He yelled at the old man to stand up straight, or he would be hit. As Robert was loading his rifle, his ramrod was shot in two, but luckily he had a wiper, with which he rammed down the bullet. Just at this moment, he observed an Indian stealthily creeping around to get a fair shot at old Wyckoff; watching him closely, till he attempted to crawl over a log, he fired and shot him through the body. He sprang in the air, gave a tremendous yell, and fell. His comrades rushed up and bore him off, when the whites made away as rapidly as possible. He appeared to be the chief or commander of the party, and no doubt it was lucky for the whites that he was shot............. After this nearly all the inhabitants fled to the river and forted themselves at various points. This took place in the summer of 1778.

The immigrants from New Jersey, who had come up that spring and winter, set off again as rapidly as they could travel to their old homes......... A number of horses had strayed away, and were supposed to have gone to LoyalSock. Captain Berry was ordered to take a company of twelve men and look after them. Robert Covenhoven, his two brothers James and Thomas, and his uncle, William Wyckoff were in the expedition. They proceeded to Loyal Sock where, it appears, they separated. Peter Shoefelt, Wm. Wyckoff, and a man named Thompson, went above the creek, towards Williamsport, to Thompson's house, for the purpose of saving some of his property. The remainder of the party continued up the creek. They proceeded cautiously through the narrows, but saw no signs of Indians. Not finding the horses, it was concluded to return. Covenhoven was suspicious that Indians were about and advised Capt. Berry not to return by the path they had come, as he feared an ambuscade. Berry thought there was no danger and paid but little attention to him, who still insisted on taking another route over the mountain. Berry at length accused him of cowardice, an being needlessly alarmed. This irritated him very much, but he insisted no more, and going to his brothers, communicated to them his fears that they would be attacked by the enemy and probably all killed. He requested them to keep a sharp lookout and if the flash of a gun were seen, to jump to trees immediately. They travel on without an molestation till they came to the narrows, and true to Covenhoven's expectation, were suddenly fired upon by a party of savages in ambush. Most of the party, including the reckless Capt. Berry, were shot down. James was shot through the shoulder and disabled. He cried to Robert that he was wounded and could do nothing, who immediately told him to run across the creek and he would try to cover his retreat. He succeeded in getting to the opposite side, when a ball struck him on the back part of the head, and he fell back on the edge of the creek dead. Robert ran for his life and jumped into an old treetop, where he loaded his rifle. He had not bee there many minutes till a big savage came and stood on a log within a few feet of where he lay, looking all around and up the hill. He watched his eye, and was prepared to shoot the minute he was discovered, and then run for his life. Had the Indian but cast eye down to his feet, he would have beheld Covenhoven. He soon ran back over the creek, where they were scalping the killed. The shrieks of the wounded and the yells of the savages were terrible. Covenhoven soon crawled out of the tree top and worked his way up the mountain. An open spot of ground was before him, which he dared not cross, for fear of being seen and pursued. Coming to where an old tree had been blown out of root, he lay down in the hole and remained there until dark, when he started across

the hills and reached Wallis' Fort in safety, and reported to the garrison the melancholy fate of the expedition. His brother Thomas, with several others, was taken prisoner and carried into captivity. He returned after the war. The other party, Shoefelt, Wyckoff and Thompson, hitched their horses when they came to Thompson's house, for they appeared to have been riding, and went in and commenced cooking their dinner. The Indians, having been quietly observing the movements of the two parties, sent a party to capture them. When they came in sight the horses snorted and gave the alarm. Seizing their rifles, they attempted to run for the woods, but the Indians were too quick and firing a volley, killed Thompson and Shoefelt and shot Wyckoff through the shoulder, wounding him severely. He was taken prisoner and returned after a captivity of two years. A story is related in connection with this tragical affair, but with how much truth I cannot say, that when Wyckoff was taken prisoner, he was quite bald-headed, but when returned from captivity, he had a fine head of hair. Page 225 Robert Covenhoven was among the party which carried young Capt. James Brady back to Sunbury after he was scalped. Page 247 Covenhoven as a Spy In 1779, an approaching body of British and Indians was rumored, and it was determined to send an active man, well acquainted with all the paths and defiles, to see what intelligence he could glean of their movements. Robert Covenhoven, who was then acting as a guide and scout for the garrison, being an expert woodsman, was selected for the dangerous task. He started alone, preferring no company, as he thought he could better elude observation thanif accompanied by several men, who might not obey his instructions. Purposely avoiding all the Indian paths, he shaped his course through the wilderness, towards the headwaters of Lycoming Creek, and traveling all night, soon arrived in the vicinity of the enemy's camp. Secreting himself in a secure position, he lay, during the day, and heard several hundred shots, from which he judged that they were cleaning their guns. Being satisfied, that a large body was about to advance, he started back over the rugged mountains, hungry and fatigued, and made as rapid progress as the nature of his path would admit. Striking an Indian path near Loyal Sock, it forcibly occurred to him that he might meet Indians if continued in it, and stepping out behind a tree to rest himself, had been there but a few minutes till two Indians rapidly passed him, humming a tune as they went. Had he continued on without stopping, they would have met him. When he arrived at the settlements, he gave the alarm, and the terrified women and children were hastily put in boats, and sent down to Fort Augusta, under his charge. Fort Meninger, at the mouth of Warrior Run, was abandoned, and intelligence sent up to Freeland's Fort, to make preparations to leave as soon as possible....... Page 188 There were fortifications in West Branch Valley. It is true that they scarcely merited the name, with the exception of one or two, and were destitute of cannon, but thy served admirable purposes at that time. The settlers were forced to abandon their rude cabins, their little fields of grain, and seek refuge within these enclosures from the scalping knife of the savage. The women and children remained in the forts, whilst the men, in armed companies, would venture to their fields and houses, and cut their crops. Those who refused to seek the forts generally paid for their rashness with their lives. Pennsylvania Archives, 5th Series, Vol. VIII Capt. Hepburn's Co., Northumberland County, Pa. lists at Sunbury Aug. 9, 1778 Sgt. Robert Covenhoven Privates Joseph Wyckoff, James Covenhoven, John Covenhoven, Albert Covenhoven Capt. Cookson Long's Co. lists on Dec. 31, 1776 Robert Covenhoven James Covenhoven Peter Wyckoff Joseph Wyckoff Pennsylvania Archives, Third Series,Vol. 19, p. 561. lists Robert Crownover of Muncy Township, Northumberland Co., as paying taxes in 1783 and 1784 on one horse and one cow and in 1785 on two horses and two cows. The same source, Turbutt Township, lists a William Wyckoff as paying taxes on 330 acres, five horses and six cows., in 1785 Same source, Muncy Township, lists Peter Wicoff as paying taxes on 200 acres, four horses, and five cows. Joseph Wicoff paid taxes on one horse and one cow, and an Isaac Wicoff also paid taxes of one pound and five shillings. Biographical Annals of deceased Residents of the West Branch Valley of the Susquehanna by J. f. Meginness, Williamsport, Pa; gazette and bulletin Printing house, 1889 "He grew to manhood in New Jersey, and when so many of the natives of that State emigrated to the West Branch Valley, before the commencement of the Indian troubles, his father was among them, bringing with him, a daughter, named Isabella and at least three sons. The family of Robert Covenhoven, with their relatives, settled on the Loyalsock and commenced making improvements. At first Robert was employed as a hunter and axeman to the surveyors of land in the valleys of the North and West Branches of the Susquehanna. The familiarity thus acquired with all the paths of the wilderness at that time rendered his service eminently useful as a scout and guide to the military parties of the Revolution. At the call of his country in 1776, he joined the campaigns under General Washington. He was at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. His younger brother had also enlisted, but his father took his place and the General, with his characteristic kindness, permitted the boy to return and protect his mother. In the autumn of 1777, Job Chilloway, a friendly Indian, had given intimation tht a powerful descent of maraunding Indians might be expected before long on the head waters of the Susquehanna. Near the close of that seas on the Indians killed a settler by the name of Saltsman, on the Sinnemahoning, and Daniel Jones at the mouth of the Tangascootac. Mr. Covenhoven married Miss Mercy Kelsey Cutter, February 22, 1778. Very little is know of the family of Miss Cutter but that they were natives of New Jersey there seems to be no doubt. She was captured by the Hessians near Trenton, robbed of her silver shoe buckles, partly denuded of her clothing, and tied to a tree. In this condition she was found by Mr. Covenhoven, who was a soldier in the American army, and released. This was his first introduction to Miss Cutter, and the friendship formed on this occasion finally ripened into love, which resulted in marriage. Robert was the principal guide to Colonel Harley when he made his famous march up Lycoming Creek in September, 1778. The expedition was sent out for the purpose of destroying Indian villages on the head waters of the North Branch and its tributaries. It consisted of about 200 men and started from Fort Muncy, September 21st. The march was tedious and perilous. The great swamp below Williamsport retarded their movements very much. They had several fights with Indians before they reached Tioga Point, and killed a number of them. After inflicting great damage on the savages by destroying their towns and cornfields, the expedition descended the North Branch to Wyoming. They had a severe battle near Wyalusing, but succeeded in defeating the enemy. The expedition suffered much from fatigue and scarcity of provisions but got through with the loss of but few men. In 1796, a Mr. Williamson, of New York, agent for Sir William Pulteney, opened a rough wagon road from Newberry to Painted Post, and Mr. Covenhoven was chosen to superintend the work. Soon after peace had been restored by the last treaty at Fort Stanwix in 1784, and the disputed territory between Lycoming and Pine Creeks had been purchased and brought into market, he commenced looking around for a suitable location to estaablish a farm. He finally fixed on a tract situated in Level Corner, on the river, three miles East of Jersey Shore, and called "Conquest," which he purchased from James Hepburn and Mary, his wife, for 310 pounds, 15s, 8d. The deed was made August 11, 1790, and was acknowledged the same day. It may be found recorded in Deed book E, volume 5 page 141, Lycoming County, and as it recites some important facts, and extract is given. In 1832 he applied through James Gamble, Esq, then a young attorney at Jersey Shore, and received a pension from the Government for his services as a soldier and scout during the Revolution. It amounted to about one hundred dollars per annum. Robert was 90 years of age when he died in 1846, and was buried in the cemetery of the Presbyterian church, Northumberland. A Hero of the Revolution In the abandoned graveyard of the old Presbyterian church Northumberland, Pa., stand a plain, upright marble tombstone, bearing this inscription: In Memory of ROBERT COVENHOVEN, who was Born December 7, 1775 And departed this Life October 29th, 1846, Aged 90 years, 10 months & 22 Days He was an active Partisan Guide of the Revolutionary Army. Covenhoven whose name was changed in modern days to Crownover, was of Hollandish descent, and was born in Monmouth county, N. J. About 1772 he came with his parents, several brothers and a sister, and settled near the mouth of Loyalsock Creek. It was then in Berks county, but the same year Northumberland county was erected, which embraced the site of their settlement. It is now in the center of Lycoming county. The family of young Covenhoven suffered much at the hands of the savages. He became a noted spy, guide and frontiersman, and participated in the thrilling scenes of the Big Runaway in 1778. The full story of his life and adventures would fill a volume. In an abandoned, dilapidated, and desecrated old graveyard, on Fourth Street, in the city of Williamsport, could be seen a few years ago a plain headstone, with this inscription: Sacred to the memory of MERCY K. CUTTER,, Wife of Robert Covenhoven. Born January 19, 1755 And Departed this Life November 27, 1843, Aged 88 years, 10 months, and 8 days.

The remains of the Revolutionary hero and his wife like forty miles apart. She died nearly three years before her husband at their home in what is now Platt township, Lycoming county. Soon after, her husband, borne down by the weight of years, went to live with a daughter near Northumberland, and there he died, as stated above, and was buried. This explains how they came to be buried in separate places. Another singular fact may be stated in connection with this historical couple. The ground in which the ashes of Covenhoven's wife now mingle, was deeded March 26, 1776, by Amariah Sutton for a burial place "forever" for the early settlers and their descendants. This was three months before the Declaration of Independence was proclaimed. The deed is on record at Williamsport. The ground was afterwards consecrated by the blood of half a dozen or more men, women and children cruelly slain by the savages within a few yards of the spot where they were laid. For three-quarters of a century it was used as a burial ground, and hundreds of early settlers there found a resting place. But civilization has desecrated the sacred ground, and the wishes of the donor, who was also buried there, have been disregarded. It is one of the oldest graveyards in Northern Pennsylvania with a recorded title; but that makes no difference to the present generation. They care but little for the memories of the pioneers, and less for the sacredness of the ground in which they are buried. JOHN OF LANCASTER, Williamsport." This is from Egle's Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries pages 118-119, which Shiela McCord sent me many years ago.






Robert Covenhoven was much employed in his youth as an axeman and a hunter to surveyors of land in the valleys that were tributary to the North and West Branches of the Susquehanna. Robert Covenhoven joined Washington's Army in New Jersey and took part in the battles of Trenton and Princeton, when the Revolution broke out. He returned home in spring 1776 to protect the defenceless frontier where his home was. In spring 1778 murders of settlers caused the need to evacuate Fort Muncy, and go to refuge in Sunbury. Only Covenhoven was willing to carry the word to the settlers. There were 12-13 notches on his black hunting knife each representing an Indian killed by him. His gun was an old flintlock with a barrel six-foot long. This would have been similar to the gun Daniel Boone carried into Kentucky. Covenhoven told his great-grandson W H Sanderson that his gun never misfired when it was needed. Ref. article in Williamsport Sun-Gazette 27 March 1999, page 14. Capt Cookson Long's Co of the 2nd Battalion, Northumberland Co: James Potter, list of privates included Robert Covenhoven, Peter Wyckoff, Joseph Wyckoff.

At 1835 Census of Pensioners Robert Covenhoven's name appears in Jersey Shore Mifflin Twp, Lycoming Co PA age 85, with a large family.
His house at Level Corner mentioned in 1812 in an advert of Walter Potts

Note: these "Pennsylvania Rifles" were made by the Henry family of Lancaster and Nazareth. Daniel Morgan's famous regiment was armed with these accurate long-distance-carrying Pensylvania Rifles. Morgan was born in Hunterdon Co, NJ where his father was employed in the Durham Furnace. Daniel Boone carried one of these rifles into the wilds of Kentucky. The official records show that the Valley of the Delaware and nearby regionsof the Susquehanna furnished more rifles, cannons, cannon balls and powder for Washignton's army than any other region of the colonies. Ref. Coman's Industrial History of the US."

Covenhoven, Robert - Pennsylvania #11905, Lycoming County in the State of Pennsylvania- was a private in the Company commanded by Capt. Cookiny (sp? probably refers to Cookson Long?) of the Regiment commanded by Col. Murray in the Penna Troops for two years.
Inscribed on the Roll of Pennsylvania at the rate of $80 per annum on 4 March 1831. Certificate of Pension filed 15 July 1833 and sent to A V Parsons, Jersey Shore, PA. Arrears to 4 March 1833 $160.00 plus semi-??? allowance ending September 1833 $80.00 - total $200.
Revolutionary Claim Act 7 June 1832. Recorded by D Brown, clerk; Book E, Vol 5 page 9.

State of Pennsylvania, County of Lycoming - on the 5th day September Anno Domini one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, personally appeared in open court before the Honorable Seth Chapman and his associate judges of the Court of Common Pleas now sitting, Robert Crownover, a resident of Mifflin Twp in the County of Lycoming, State of Pennsylvania aged seventy-six years, who being duly sworn as according to law doth upon his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed 7 June 1832.
That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and services as herein stated - in the autumn of 1776 he volunteered in the Rifle Company commanded by Capt.Cookson Long in the Regiment commanded by Col. James Murray of the United States Troops of Pennsylvania. He was then living at Fort Muncy in Northumberland Co. He marched to Philadelphia and thence to Trenton in the State of New Jersey, thence to Princeton where they fought and defeated the Hessians under the command of General Washington about the 25th December 1776. He then marched to Princeton where they took 300 Hessian prisoners, he then marched to Shank (sp?) Mills near the mouth of Millstone River near to which place they took from the enemy 300 wagons laden with plunder and sp? Forage, thence they marched to Morristown where Washington stopped and ordered the volunteers to march to Piscataque Short Hills whence he the said applicant marched under the command of the said Capt. Long and Col. Murray and remained there until they were discharged having been in actual service four months.
He then volunteered in the Company of Capt. William Hepburn in the Battalion of Col. Hunter in the spring of 1778 for the purpose of protecting the inhabitants from the depredation of the hostile Indians. He the said applicant being fully acquainted with the surrounding country and the locations, strength and mode of warfare of the Indians. He was appointed by Capt. Hepburn as leader of the scouting and spying parties that were constantly on alert and watching the movements of the enemy (when the intelligence of the massacre at Wyoming reached the troops stationed at Sunbury Col. Hunter who had the command at said place issued orders to Capt. Hepburn to repair to Sunbury, the said applicant carried said express to Antises (sp?) Fort and they then repaired to Sunbury. They there rec'd reinforcements from the eastern counties and returned to Muncy to build a garrison. Col. Broadhead came to their assistance from Fort Pitt and then the militia were drafted and taken from them.
He the said applicant was contracted (sp?) by Col. Broadhead as a guide to all scouting parties, expresses and etc. That he frequently guided scouting parties to Jenkies (sp?) Fort and also to the Fort at Wyoming and carried express from said places to Col. Hartley who succeeded Col. Broadhead at Fort Muncy. After Col. Hartley had completed the fortifications at Muncy he rec'd orders from Col. Hunter to march to Tioga County for the purposes of heading (sp?) Butler who was carrying off the plunder from Wyoming. He the said applicant guided the troops under the command of Col. Hartley to said point where they met the enemy and took from them all their cattle and plunder and bought them back to Wyoming.
He the said applicant, was then sent (at the peril of his life) with an express to the Fort at Muncy, to appraise them of a party of Indians that were then - or had pursued Col. Hartley to Wyoming and were then in the neighbourhood. That he was then sent from the Fort at Muncy to Sunbury with an express requesting an immediate reinforcement to defend the county and that he again returned to Fort Muncy with information in reply.

He then returned to Sunbury and met Col. Hartley with the troops there, that a re-enforcement was dispatched and led by the said applicant to Fort Muncy. He the said applicant was out with the scouting parties etc at various times afterwards - at one time his party were (sic "where") every man was killed but himself and that he alone escaped the massacre.
In 1779, Col. Hartley left Fort Muncy and joined in Gen. Sullivan's Company. The fort was left in the care of Capt. Hepburn and the said applicant remained with Capt. Hepburn to defend the fort and protect the inhabitants against the savages with a small body of men. They rec'd intelligence of a superior force coming upon them and were compelled to retreat carrying with them the defenseless inhabitants to the fort at Sunbury. He was this in actual service in the state troops of Pennsylvania for a term exceeding two years.

And in answers to inquires prepared by the Secretary of War the said applicant saith as follows:
Question1 - Where and in what year were you born? Answer - he was born near Princeton in the State of New Jersey, the Year of Our Lord - 1755.
Question 2 - Have you any record of your age and if so where is it? Answer - the record of my age is in my father's Bible but I have not got it, my brother has it.
Question 3 - Where were you living when called into service, where have you lived since the Revolutionary War and where do you now live? Answer - in Northumberland County in the State of Pennsylvania and have lived there since in Lycoming County and state ever since the Revolutionary War.
Question 4 - Where were you called into service? Answer - he volunteered.
Question 5 - State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops where you served…continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service. Answer - I can state no more fully than the foregoing declaration which I have made.
Question 6 - Did you ever receive a discharge from the service and, if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it? Answer - he rec'd a discharge from Gen. Washington at the expiration of the first four months service, he never rec'd any other and that is now lost.
Question 7 - State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighbourhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and the belief of your services as a soldier in the revolution. Answer - I am known to the Rev'd John H Grier, the clergyman of the society to which I belong; to Samuel Stewart, Esq who is my neighbour, to Henry Antes/ Antis and also to Henry Hill whose deposition is hereto attached taken before Simon Schuler, Esq of the ???of ??? wit. and hereto attached.
Following here are two or three sentences apparently by a court clerk which are impossible to read -"he freely relinquishes any " and the words "sworn" day "and year." Signed: Rob't Covenhoven. (his signature in full)

A 2nd declaration was made by Robert Covenhoven on 3 April 1833 - this one only two pages in length and with the same details of his service as the four-page declaration detailed above)

Document from the Treasury Dept, Second Comptroller's Office dated 24 December 1838: Sir, under the Act of the 6th April 1838 entitled "An Act directing the transfer of money remaining unclaimed by certain pensioners, and authorizing the payment of the same at the Treasury of the United States, Robert Covenhoven, a pensioner on the Roll of the Philadelphia, PA Agency, a the rate of $80 per annum, under the law of the 7th June 1832, has been paid at this Department from the 4th of Sept 1837 to the 4th March 1838. Respectfully Yours, Albion K Parris (sp???), Comptroller. cc. to the Commissioner of Pensions, Present.

Following in the file are various inquires for his service and/or pension record: Mr G A Barber of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society in either 1938 or 1958; Mr Frank Tade of Sacramento CA in 1936; Mrs E L Florence W Coates of Boulder CO in 1915; Hon Peter G Ten Eyke of the House of Representatives in 1913.

Document: Invalid Pension Certificate 12,574 (very faint on film) Act June 1831, Vol ??page 78..



Robert Covenhoven,
Revolutionary Scout
And Other Dutch Settlers in the
West Branch Valley
BY C. WARREN GUTELIUS

Presented before the Society September 8, 1944 The subject on which your speaker is to address our Historical Society tonight brings to my mind and to the minds of some other folks in the audience recollections of the old church graveyards in my native town, Northumberland, of which there were four or five, and all of which, as I recall, were in existence less than fifty years ago. I remember that on one occasion, when an uncle living in the middle West came to Northumberland to visit his sister, my mother, after he had been welcomed and had sat down for a late supper, told the family circle how the conductor on the train coming from Harrisburg to Northumberland, as he took up the uncle's ticket, exclaimed, "Ha! ha! You are going to one of our old Pennsylvania towns where the dogs run around snatching bones out of the graveyards !"

This comment may have been a considerable exaggeration, still it is only too true that these early denominational graveyards, not only in Northumberland, but in many another town and city in the older settled part of the country the Eastern Seaboardin the course of time became forgotten and neglected. This, of course, has been due to the fact that the nearest relatives and descendants of persons interred in these graveyards went to other and distant parts of the country to reside, and, for the most part, descendants after several generations are not so interested in seeing that the graves of their ancestors are kept in good order.

In the absence of perpetual care arrangements such as we have for modern community cemeteries, it is not surprising that in many of these old churchyard cemeteries the markers became corroded and shabby, were nicked and broken by vandals, many sagged from their original upright positions, and the graves were covered by a wild and motley overgrowth.

The old church graveyard in Northumberland which I best recall, because it was the largest and most conspicuous, and consequently the most inviting to rambling, curious children, was the one that had been attached to the Old School Presbyterian Church on King Street at Church Avenue, or alley, as it was then called, and it was because the church stood there that this narrow thoroughfare was given its name. The graveyard was exposed to both King and Third Streets, and, as John F. Meginness refers to it in his very excellent History of the West Branch Valley, it was indeed and truly "a Common", for children often tripped in to play hide and seek among the tombstones, emerging with plenty of Spanish needles protruding from their stockings, adults in their cups at night would meander into its dismal precincts to recover their equilibrium before rambling home, and even straying livestock occasionally would graze in and out among and over the tombstones, only to find to their dumb sorrow that a neglected graveyard may be a very scanty field in which to search for fodder.

Whenever I think of Thomas Gray's famous Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, wherein he soliloquizes on the vanity of much of our human strivings, I cannot help but recall this old Presbyterian burial ground in Northumberland as it still existed back in my boyhood days. However, unlike the English churchyard in which Gray sat and meditated, where, it seems, none but the remains of those of lowly and simple achievements rested, in this old Northumberland graveyard there were the remains of a number of persons who had distinguished themselves in conspicuous ways in the service of our infant nation, and were known for their deeds throughout Pennsylvania, or at least all through the West Branch and the North Branch valleys.

Among these graves was that of a patriot who, when barely more than a youth, rendered a vital service to the inhabitants of this part of the country during the trying days of the Revolution, and especially during those years of the Tory and Indian invasions of the West Branch and North Branch valleys, occasioning the Great Runaway of the settlers.

This was the grave of Robert Covenhoven. Years ago when the old graveyard was finally abandoned by the proper legal procedures to provide lots for the erection of homes on King Street, the grave marker, and maybe what were left of the remains of Robert Covenhoven, along with those of other pioneers interred there, were removed to Riverview Cemetery, and today the marker for Covenhoven stands within a few feet of the old cannon mounted on the G. A. R. plot. The inscription, which is almost obliterated, reads as follows:

          In memory of
     ROBERT CROWNOVER
     Who was born December 7th,
               1755,
     And departed this life October 29th,
               1846,
     Aged 90 Years, 10 Months & 22 Days.
     He was an Active Partisan Guide
     of the Revolutionary Army.

The difference between the name as it appears on the old marker, and that commonly given to the same man by several outstanding historians of this section of Pennsylvania, will be explained later. Incidentally, let me say that practically all of the information regarding Robert Covenhoven presented in this paper is gleaned from the History of the West BrcAch Valley by John F. Meginness, that comprehensive collection of sectional historical lore commonly known by the title 'Otzinachson' the legendary name of the river, which, among other chroniclers, was occasionally used by the famous Indian interpreter, Conrad Weiser, in his journal.

Whenever we think of early Dutch settlers and their communities in America, we naturally think of New Amsterdam, the Hudson River Valley, Long Island, and northern New Jersey, where the first immigrants from Holland located in the early days. This section of the country converging on our modern metropolis of New York, has given a number of prominent figures of Dutch descent to the nation, the most outstanding of whom have been members of two distinct branches of the Roosevelt family. But we have not heard nor read so much about the further migrations of these people from the Low Countries or their descendants, who in groups early pushed onward and settled in other parts of the country. Such, for instance, was the group of Holland folk who came from the community in central New Jersey to the frontier country of the West Branch several years prior to the beginning of the War for Independence. Among these families were the ovenhovens, Wyckoffs, Van Camps, Van Nests, and others.

Their homes in New Jersey had been at Drie Hook, meaning Three Corners, so called because of the peculiar arrangement of the roads in that vicinity, and near the Hollands Brook, which issued from the Cushetunk Mountain, and was so called because from the living spring, which was its source, to the spot where it falls into the South Branch near the head of the Raritan River, its banks were occupied by Hollanders. More than a century had elapsed since the surrender of the New Netherlands to the British, but the inhabitants in this section still maintained with characteristic steadfastness the customs and usages of their fathers. The language of the law courts was English, but that of the home, of social intercourse, and of the church, was still "Low Dutch". At this time the wonderful fertility of "the Shemokem country" was attracting attention, and considerable numbers of the ScotchIrish, who also had settlements in New Jersey, were already in this section. So it was only natural that people of the Holland groups should also be looking for "greener pastures" in this so favorably mentioned section of Pennsylvania.

In regard to the Covenhovens, all the branches of the family were descended from Wolfert Gerrisse Van Kouwenhoven, who immigrated to the New Netherlands in 1630. His son, Gerrit, was known as Gerrit Wolfertsen, and his son, William, as William Gerritsen. They all lived on Long Island. William Gerritsen had six sons: William, Peter, Cornelius, Albert, Jacob and John. These all removed to Monmouth County, New Jersey, except William, whose sons, however, followed their uncles thither. It was Albert Covenhoven, his three sons, James, Thomas, and Robert, and daughter, Isabella, who came to the West Branch Valley, and settled near the mouth of Loyalsock Creek. Albert Covenhoven had married a sister of Peter and William Wyckoff, who, with their families, had also come to the West Branch Valley and located in the same neighborhood. As Meginness makes no mention of the wife in this part of the country, we assume that she had died before the migration was made.

The original form of this family name was Kouwenhoven. Some descendents living in New Jersey during the latter part of the last century were still writing their names Cowenhoven. Colloquially, the "Jersey Dutch" were in the habit of changing the final "n" to "r", and pronouncing the word Kou'wenhover, with the accent on the first syllable. From this transition was easy to Cownover, which in Pennsylvania became Crownover, and in New Jersey, Conover, the form that came to be used almost universally in that State.

The several variations in the spelling of this surname offers a striking example of the odd changes that have taken place in the spelling and pronunciation of family names in the course of generations, and in the transition from one section of the country to anotherespecially names of several syllables. In the case of this name Covenhoven, there was such an unusual variation taken in the forms of the name that Meginness makes a special note of it in his history. To those persons with a fancy for delving into the nomenclature of the species, this name Covenhoven should offer an enchanting field for inquiry. Robert Covenhoven had eight children, and it is likely that two or three of them were living in this section at the time of his death in 1846, and that they authorized the inscription appearing on his tombstone. The name Crownover, instead of Covenhoven appears on this marker, and so it is altogether likely that the former was the name by which he was known in his generation. But, as mentioned before, Meginness and other sectional historians for some particular reason chose to use for the name of this courageous pioneer the form of Covenhoven, and so that is the name a lesser historian employs in the account of his exploits.

Albert Covenhoven and his family came to the Loyalsock about the year 1772, but hardly had they gotten settled in their new frontier home until they lost practically all of their effects by a sudden flood from the creek, and the family was reduced to great distress. At first Robert Covenhoven was employed as a hunter and axeman by the surveyors who were busily engaged in surveying the lands that had just come into the market. The knowledge thus acquired of the devious paths of the wilderness afterwards rendered his services eminently useful as a guide and scout to the military parties of the Revolution. It is needless to say that the graduate of such a school was fearless and intrepid, that he was alert in the wiles of Indian warfare, and necessarily had to possess a rugged constitution.

Early in the Revolution Robert Covenhoven went to New Jersey, and entered the patriot Army under General Washington. He participated in the battles of Trenton and Princeton. In the spring of 1717 he returned to the Loyalsock, where his services were more needed for the defense of the frontier than on the more thickly populated seaboard, for the new settlers were becoming apprehensive under frequent rumors of an intensive Indian invasion. A younger brother, either James or Thomas, had also enlisted in the Continental Army, and was also released to come back to the frontier shortly before Robert's return.

But Robert Covenhoven's experience as a young Continental in New Jersey was not without an important romantic incident. Mercy Kelsey Cutter, a Trenton maiden, had been captured by the Hessians, stripped of much of her clothing and accessories, including her silver shoe buckles, and left tied to a tree. In this situation she was found by Covenhoven and promptly released. His gallantry and the maiden's gratitude resulted in such a strong attachment that it ripened into genuine love. Whether she came along up to the Loyalsock with him when he returned for his enlistment, or whether he went back to Trenton to fetch her later, it is not stated, but anyhow they were married somewhere on February 22, 1778. We are indebted to Mr. Godcharles for the particulars of this important episode in the life of Robert Covenhoven, as it is related in one of his Daily Stories of Pennsylvania History published some years ago.

The young man returned none too soon to render his invaluable services to the settlers on the threatened frontier, although his first efforts ended in utter futility. Realizing that drastic action would have to be taken to protect the settlements, he with some others, including Lieut. William King, whose wife and two young daughters were then living in Northumberland, went ahead with the building of a stout stockade near the mouth of Lycoming Creek. It covered maybe half an acre, and was also located near what later became the intersection of Fourth and Stevens Streets in Williamsport. The evacuation of the inhabitants of the valley occurred before the completion of the structure, and nothing but tradition remains to tell us of the last feeble effort put forth to save the first citizens of what was to become Williamsport, then a small settlement known as Jaysburg, from destruction.

It was to this stockade that a party of settlers from as far down the West Branch as Northumberland were making their way by wagon as rapidly as possible on June 10, 1778, when they were set upon by a band of Indians in ambush within a short distance of their intended haven, and most of the party were killed outright or scalped, including the wife of William King, who had left Northumberland reluctantly, taking with her the two young daughters. She died in the woods a few hours after being scalped, and the two children were carried into captivity. After the close of the war William King recovered both of these daughters in Canada, but not without considerable traveling and difficulty.

This precipitate flight of settlers from the lower regions of the North and West Branch valleys to the frontier stockade up the valley of the West Branch was occasioned by rumors of a descent by the Tories and Indians on the North Branch, which had aroused fears for the safety of Northumberland. Settlers in Northumberland who were up the West Branch, strange to say, really thought their families would be safer in the stockades and forts upstream than below, and they sent or came down for themthis in spite of the continual rumors that the upper West Branch Valley was likely to be invaded at any time. But such, it seems, was frequently the desperation of our neglected frontier ancestors in those days of the Revolution "that really tried men's souls". When the only real security lay in going down the main stream of the Susquehanna, as the settlers were to realize a few weeks later when they were to participate in the Great Runaway, they left the end of one hazardous valley only to ascend another equally or even more fraught with danger.

The danger to the valley in that summer of 1778 soon became so great that a panic seized the inhabitants, and nearly all of them about Muncy fled to Brady's Fort. Those above, and up to Lycoming Creek, took refuge at Wallis' Fort. The inhabitants of Penn's Valley gathered to Potter's Fort. Those below the Muncy Hills, to Chillisquaque, were assembled at Freeland's and Boone's forts, and at Fort Augusta. Those in White Deer and Buffalo valleys fled to the river, fortifying themselves at various points to make a stand for as long as they could hold out. Not realizing that great danger lurked in the West Branch Valley, and that another phase of the war was about to descend upon the frontier country with exceeding barbarity, many new immigrants from New Jersey had come up to this section in the previous winter and spring, but with the first sallies of the Indians and Tories on the settlements, not being so well rooted nor having so many interests at stake in the new soil as those who had come into the valley from New Jersey a few years previously, set off again as rapidly as they could travel to their old homes.

Colonel Hepburn, afterwards Judge Hepburn, was stationed for a while at Muncy Fort, and commanded it. Colonel Hosterman, Captain Reynolds, Captain Berry, and others, were sent up from Fort Augusta soon afterwards to assist in protecting the frontier.

On the intelligence of the critical situation reaching Colonel Hunter at Fort Augusta, he became greatly alarmed for the safety of those who remained above Fort Muncy, and he sent word to Colonel Hepburn to order them to abandon the country and retire below. He did this, he stated, because there was not a sufficiency of troops to guard the whole frontier, and the Congress had taken no action to furnish him with men and supplies. Colonel Hepburn had considerable trouble to get a messenger to carry the order up to Colonel Antes, so panicstricken were the people on account of the ravages of the enemy. At length our Robert Covenhoven and a young millwright of the neighborhood in the employ of Andrew Culbertson, whose name, by the way, ought to be known, volunteered their services and started on the dangerous mission. They crossed the river, ascended Bald Eagle Mountain, and kept along the summit until they came to the gap opposite Antes Fort. They then cautiously descended at the head of Nippenose Bottom and proceeded to the fort. It was in the evening, and as they neared the fort the report of a rifle rang upon their ears. A girl had gone outside to milk a cow, and an Indian lying in ambush fired upon her. The ball passed through her clothes between her limbs and she escaped unharmed. The young men reached the fort without being attacked, the orders were passed on up to the Horn's Fort, and preparations were made for the flight. Great excitement prevailed among the settlers. Canoes were collected, rafts hastily constructed, and every available craft that would float was pressed into service, and wives, children and goods were placed on board to be floated down the river to a place of safety. It is said that in many instances household utensils and articles of value that could not be removed, on account of the scanty means of transportation, were hurriedly buried by the owners. When they returned a few years later they were generally found to be in fair condition. It was indeed a sudden as well as an exciting flight. The inhabitants were fleeing from their primitive homes to escape the merciless foe, and leaving their cattle and ripening crops behind.

Robert Covenhoven had returned from his mission, and was now engaged in aiding the flight of the settlers in every possible way. In an account of the runaway written some years later, he thus describes the scene on the West Branch:

"I took my own family to Sunbury, and came back in a keelboat to secure my furniture. Just as I rounded a point above Derrstown, now Lewisburg, I met the whole convoy from all the forts above. Such a sight I never saw in my life. Boats, canoes, hogtroughs, rafts hastily made of dry sticks, every sort of floating article, had been put in requisition, and were crowded with women, children, and plunder. There were several hundred people in all. Whenever any obstruction occurred at any shoal or riple, the women would leap out into the water and put their shoulders to the boat or raft and launch it again into deep water. The men of the settlements came down in single file on each side of the river to guard the women and children. The whole convoy arrived safely at Sunbury, leaving the entire range of farms along the West Branch to the ravages of the Indians."

As soon as possible after the mass flight small bands of armed men cautiously ventured up the river to secure cattle, horses and other effects that had been left behind. They found small bands of Indians engaged in pillage and destruction, and at night the sky was reddened by the lurid glare caused by burning cabins, barns and outhouses. The beautiful valley was a sickening scene of desolation. But the Indians did not tarry for long on the West Branch. Soon after the runaway their attention was diverted to the memorable descent upon Wyoming, which took place on the following July third, and they hastened from the valley to be present at that awful massacre.

At the same time the Covenhovens and other Dutch families came from New Jersey, a Scotchman by the name of John Thomson and his wife, who lived closed to the Dutch settlements in that colony, and were particular friends of the Wyckoff family, also came to the West Branch country and located in the same neighborhood. On the same day that the party from Northumberland were on their wayto Robert Covenhoven's stockadeJune 10, 1788 and met with almost complete massacre within a short distance of the new structure, John Thomson, with his wife and child, and as many personal belongings as they could hastily collect, made their way to Wallis' Fort, seven miles away. Here he found several of his friends and neighbors who had preceded him to this place of refuge.

The weather was rainy, and the scouts sent out could discover no signs of the enemy. The canny Scot began to regret that he had so hastily abandoned his possessions. He determined to make an effort to bring off his cattle. An opportunity occurred when Captain Berry was sent out with a small company to look after some horses that had been stolen by Indians, and were said to be some distance up the Loyalsock. Two men, who had found refuge at the fort, were willing to assist in Thomson's endeavor. One was Peter Shufelt, another Dutch settler, and the other was William Wyckoff, a lad of sixteen.

These three men, likely mounted on Thomson's horses, separated from Captain Berry's company at the crossing of the Loyalsock, and went on to Thomson's place. Here they found everything apparently as it had been left, and tying their horses near the door, went into the house. It was now long past noon, and they were hungry. Accordingly they at once set about preparing a meal. But suddenly the horses snorted with alarm, and, rushing to the door, they saw Indians approaching from the barn, where they had been lying in ambush. The men seized their rifles and ran for the woods; but the Indians rushed upon them with terrific yells, firing as they came, and Peter Shufelt fell mortally wounded. Thomson immediately stopped and returned the fire. But this endeavor to save his friend resulted in the loss of his own life. Some of the Indians had reserved their fire for this opportunity, and now delivered it with telling effect. A bullet from this second volley passed through his powder horn, which burned at his side as he laid adying. William Wyckoff succeeded in reaching the woods, but was severely wounded, and finally captured at the end of a skirmish.

We have mentioned this incident because it was Robert Covenhoven who brought Thomson's distracted widow and her small boy down the river with other refugees to tarry at Fort Augusta. She had been Juda Bodine, a girl of French Huguenot extraction, whose ancestors had settled on Staten Island. How long she remained in Sunbury is not known, but she availed herself of an early opportunity to set her face again toward the home of her youth. Her little boy was too small to make the journey on foot and too large to be carried in arms. The horses had been lost the day of her husband's death. She succeeded in securing a little wagon suitable for the purpose, and in it she placed her child, a copy of the Bible that had been particularly cherished by her husband, and such slight articles of apparel as she had been able to bring with her from Loyalsock. This cart she pulled, through storm and sunshine, the whole two hundred and fifty miles, over the mountains and across the streams, through "The Beech Woods" to Easton, and then over the Jersey Hills to her home.

Of such stuff were many of our ancestors made. Oh, why! oh, why! do so many of us in this day fuss and fume about trifles?

But to go back to Captain Berry's company of men that set out from Fort Wallis to look for the stolen horses: Robert Covenhoven's brothers, James and Thomas, were in the party, as well as Peter Wyckoff, father of the boy captured at Thomson's, two other sons, Cornelius and Joseph Wyckoff, and Peter's brother, William. Besides these there was a friendly Indian, known as Captain Sharpshins, a Negro, and others to the number of twelve. For some reason, probably because of information received at the fort after their departure, a messenger was dispatched after them to advise an immediate return. The messenger was Robert Covenhoven. But Captain Berry refused to acknowledge Colonel Hepburn's authority, and persisted in going forward. This being the case, and so many of his relatives being in the expedition, Robert Covenhoven determined to go along as guide.

The party proceeded cautiously through the narrows, and so on up the creek, searching in vain for the horses, until they thought they had gone far enough. They then determined to retrace their steps, and accordingly set out again down the creek. Robert Covenhoven believed that there were Indians in the vicinity, and advised a return by a safer, though more difficult, route through the woods, and over the mountain, in order to avoid the danger of an ambuscade. But Captain Berry thought there was no danger, and paid little attention to his warning. He insisted until Berry impatiently said he was needlessly alarmed, and accused him of cowardice. This irritated him and he insisted no more. He went privately, however, to his brothers and communicated to them his fears that they would be attacked, and that if so they would probably all be killed. He urged them to keep a sharp lookout, and if the flash of a gun was seen, to spring immediately to the protection of some friendly tree.

They traveled on without molestation until they again reached the narrows, where they were suddenly fired upon by a band of Indians in ambush. Some of the party, including the reckless Captain Berry, were shot down. Robert Covenhoven, however, and a few others escaped, and returned to the fort to report the fate of the expedition. His brother, Thomas, Peter Wyckoff, his son, Cornelius, and the Negro were made prisoners. The Negro was afterward burned alive in the presence of the other prisoners, who did not know whether or not they would meet the same fate. Joseph Wyckoff, another son of Peter, was also captured about the same time. He was taken off while rolling logs in a sawmill near the settlement. All of these captives, including young William Wyckoff taken at Thomson's, were eventually returned to their people. William married his cousin, Isabella Covenhoven, several years after the close of the war.

A week or so before the events just narrated, the Covenhoven brothers, including Robert, and their uncle, the elder William Wyckoff, came near being killed by stealthy Indians right near their homes. This was when the settlers were still sticking to their regular work, and hoping against hope that the worst would not happen, although the more prudent ones were on the alert. The uncle had a rude tannery on the Loyalsock, and made leather for the settlement. On this particular day he was at work in his tannery, and the three nephews were mowing in an adjacent meadow. Their dog suddenly commenced barking, and exhibited great symptoms of alarm. He would run toward the woods, sniff the air, and return. The Covenhovens were confident that Indians were near, and, seizing their rifles, called to the older man to accompany them to some place of greater security. At first he refused, alleging that there was no danger, but at last yielded to their persuasions and went with them. They had not proceeded far when one of them hissed to the dog, which at once bounded into the bushes and seized by the leg an Indian who was hiding there. He jumped up and shot the animal. A couple of other settlers had joined the Covenhovens, and they all immediately jumped to trees. The Indians, who had been lying in ambush, did the same, and the firing began. Wyckoff, who was very much humpbacked, got behind a tree that was too small to hide all of his person. Fortunately for him another small tree stood between him and the Indians, and, as they fired at him, their bullets struck this tree, and made the bark fly around Robert Covenhoven, who was near. He yelled to the uncle to stand up straight or he would be hit. As he was loading his rifle his ramrod was shot in two, but luckily he had a wiper, with which he rammed down the bullet. Just at this moment he observed an Indian steathily creeping around to get a good shot at his uncle. Watching him closely until he attempted to crawl over a log, he fired and shot him right through the body. The Indian sprang into the air, gave a tremendous yell, and fell dead. His comrades rushed up and bore him off, and the Covenhoven party made away as rapidly as possible. The dead Indian had appeared to be the leader of the party, and had not the spirit been taken out of the others by his death; all of the white men in the fray might have been worsted in the encounter.

As the Indians continued to be very troublesome, it soon became apparent to the military authorities that some offensive operations would have to be undertaken against the relentless foe, or the inhabitants, would be in imminent danger all the time. With this object in view, Colonel Thomas Hartley, in the autumn of 1778, planned an expedition to Tioga Point, on the headwaters of the North Branch, to destroy some of their villages and break up their places of rendezvous. Robert Covenhoven was in the expedition, and did his share in making it highly successful. In the closing years of his life he frequently took pleasure in relating a story about an artifice he and a comrade, Robert King, used to capture a party of Indians who were working a loaded boat up the North Branch from the depredations committed at Wyoming. The party in the boat outnumbered them, but the prize was too tempting to be resisted. King remained in the bushes and kept up a prodigious whooping and shouting to his imaginary comrades to come on. Covenhoven rushed out with his gun in hand and ordered the Indians to surrender, which they did, and they permitted themselves to be secured without remonstrance. King made his appearance, and the two, forcing the prisoners by threats to assist them, arrived at some point along the river where a number of officers and soldiers of the Continental Army were stationed, and the Continentals cheated the poor Provincials out of their share of the plunder.

One of the most noteworthy feats performed by Robert Covenhoven occurred during the following summer1779. As the rumors of an approaching body of British, Tories and Indians from the north accumulated again, it was finally determined by Colonel Hepburn, then in command at Fort Muncy, to send a man who was well acquainted with the path and defiles of the mountains to ascertain and report their movements. Covenhoven was selected for this dangerous mission. He preferred no company, as he thought he could better elude observation if alone. Avoiding all the Indian paths, he directed his course through the wilderness towards the headwaters of Lycoming Creek, and by traveling at night he soon arrived in the vicinity of the enemy's camp. The difficulty of making such a journey at that time can readily be imagined, as it lay over rugged hills, through dark and gloomy ravines, and almost impenetrable thickets in many places. Secreting himself in a secure position, during the daytime he was able to observe the movements of the enemy. At intervals he heard shots, amounting to several hundred, which led him to believe that they were cleaning their guns in preparation for another general assault on the frontier settlements and forts, likely intending to descend Lycoming Creek by the Sheshequin war path. Satisfied that this would be very soon, he hastened to retrace his steps over the rugged hills and through the thickets, hungry and fatigued. He made as rapid progress as the nature of the country would permit. Striking an Indian path near Loyalsock, it suddenly occurred to him that he might meet Indians if he continued to travel in that direction. He stepped to one side and hid behind a large tree to rest for a short time. He had been there but a few minutes when two Indians passed by, but fortunately they did not spy him and an encounter was avoided.

When Covenhoven reached Fort Muncy and laid before Colonel Hepburn the true facts of the situation, the commander immediately started preparations for the evacuation of the fort, as the approaching forces were evidently too formidable to be resisted. The women and children at the fort were hastily placed in boats and sent down the river to Fort Augusta under the care of Covenhoven. Warnings were relayed to the garrisons of other forts in the valley, but in several instances the warnings were not heeded. Very soon Fort Muncy was taken and destroyed, but without the dire destruction of lives and capture of settlers such as occurred at Fort Freeland, where some wiseacres, who thought Covenhoven was magnifying the danger, influenced the inmates to remain there.

Soon after peace had been restored by the last treaty at Fort Stanwix in 1784, and the disputed territory between Lycoming and Pine creeks had been purchased and brought into market, Robert Covenhoven commenced looking around for a suitable piece of land to be developed into a farm. He finally fixed on a tract situated in Level Corner, on the river three miles east of Jersey Shore, and called "Conquest", which he purchased from James Hepburn and Mary Hepburn, his wife. Here the Covenhovens lived for many years, and it was on this farm that most of their family of eight children were born and raised. Many members of this Society recall the very excellent account of the building of the old Williamson Road from the West Branch up through the Genesee country in New York State, presented in an address by Rev. Kline D'A. Engle several years ago. Robert Covenhoven likely had much to do with the motley and obstreperous lot of German peasants brought from Europe as contract laborers to build this road, because in 1796 he was engaged to superintend the construction work on at least a section of the thoroughfare.

As late as 1832, when he was seventyseven years old, Robert Covenhoven applied for a pension from the Government, through the medium of James Gamble, Esq., then a young attorney in Jersey Shore, in recognition of his arduous services as a soldier and scout per annum. It would seem that the old scout never asked for any particular recognition from his country until he arrived at quite an old age, and then maybe his finances were such that it was necessary for him to do so. Mrs. Covenhoven died November 27, 1843, and her remains were buried in the old Williamsport Cemetery on Fourth Street. Before the end of the century her grave was completely obliterated.

Borne down by the weight of years, Robert Covenhoven did not long survive the passing of his wife. Soon afterwards he went to reside with his daughter Nancy, married to Leonard Pfouts, who, according to Meginness, lived in what was known as Pfouts Valley, somewhere across the river from Northumberland. Just where this valley was located, your speaker has been unable to ascertain. Maybe someone will be able to enlighten us on the matter. Anyhow, it could not have been far from Northumberland, and when Robert Covenhoven died in 1846, his remains likely were interred in the old Presbyterian graveyard in Northumberland because it was one of the most accessible cemeteries.



Within the confines of Piatt lived for many years the celebrated Robert Covenhoven, whose name is associated with many of the most stirring events in our colonial history, and to whom frequent reference has been made. He' was of Hollandish descent and was born in Monmouth county, New Jersey, December 17, 1755. His father was named Albert and with his wife, three sons, and two daughters came to the West Branch and settled at Loyalsock in 1772. On the breaking out of the Revolution Robert entered the army and was present at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. In the spring of 1777 he returned home and came actively engaged in the defense of the frontier. As a scout he excelled and had many narrow escapes from the savages. He accompanied Colonel Hartley on his memorable expedition up Lycoming creek and across the country to Tioga Point, where they destroyed "Queen Esther's Palace," Covenhoven himself applying the torch. He was bold, fearless, and active, and thoroughly acquainted with the wiles of Indian warfare. Such qualifications peculiarly fitted him for the duties of a spy and scout, and as he never shrank from the post of danger, his services were constantly in demand. His family suffered greatly at the hands of the Indians and at least one brother was killed.

Robert Covenhoven married Miss Mercy Kelsey Cutter, February 22, 1778. This was soon after his. return from the campaign in New Jersey. Soon after peace was restored he purchased a tract of land in Level Corner of James Hepburn for £310 15s 8d. It was called "Conquest." The deed was made August 11, 1790. Hepburn had acquired the land by pre-emption warrant dated September 3, 1785, and on being surveyed it was found to contain 191 acres and sixty-seven perches. Here Covenhoven and wife lived and reared their family of eight children, three sons and five daughters. Mrs. Covenhoven died, November 27, 1,843, aged eighty-eight years, ten months, and eight days, and was buried in the old cemetery on West Fourth street, Williamsport. He did not long survive the death of his wife. Borne down by the weight of years and the infirmities of age, he soon went to live with his daughter, Mrs. Nancy Pfouts, near Northumberland, where he died, October 29, 1846, aged ninety years, ten months, and twenty-two days, and was buried in the Presbyterian burial ground in Northumberland. It is now an open common, but the headstone of the veteran soldier and scout stands as firm and erect as a sentinel on the post of danger.

George Crane, a son-in-law, was the executor of the will of Robert Covenhoven, dated March 27, 1843, and he sold the farm to William Covenhoven, the only Surviving son, for $5,500. He afterwards sold it to William McGinness and moved to Loyalsock, where he died. The farm was afterward sold to John D. Cowden. It now belongs to Jesse B. Carpenter and is in excellent condition.

Before the veteran died the spelling of his name underwent a change, and was written Crownover. By this name the members of his family were known. Many descendants still survive and some of them reside at Loyalsock and in Williamsport. An excellent oil painting of the veteran, now owned by George L. Sanderson, a grandson, shows him to have been a man possessing a powerful and well knit 'frame, with abroad forehead and a countenance indicative of firmness and courage. Mr. Sanderson also possesses several relies which belonged to him, among them being a scalping knife, with his initials, " R. C.," cut on the handle, a pocket compass, and an old fashioned pistol with flint lock. The knife was made from an old file, is symmetrical in its proportions, and on the back are nine notches, which, probably is the record of the number of savages slain. The old hunters and scouts kept their records in this way. The knife is susceptible of a keen edge, has a neat wooden handle, and is a formidable looking weapon.

Children of Robert Covenhoven and Mercy Kelsey Cutter

Robert married Mercy Kelsey Cutter on Feb 22, 1778.

Mercy Kelsey Cutter

F, #139191, b. Jan 29, 1755, d. Nov 27, 1843
      Mercy Kelsey Cutter was born on Jan 29, 1755 at New Jersey. Mercy married Robert Covenhoven, son of Albert Covenhoven and Sarah Wyckoff, on Feb 22, 1778. Mercy Kelsey Cutter died on Nov 27, 1843 at Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, at age 88. Mercy was buried at Old Williamsport Cemetery, Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Mercy Kelsey Cutter and Robert Covenhoven

Nancy Covenhoven

F, #139192, b. Apr 29, 1783, d. Nov 1, 1857
Nancy Covenhoven|b. Apr 29, 1783\nd. Nov 1, 1857|p1392.htm#i139192|Robert Covenhoven|b. Dec 7, 1755\nd. Oct 29, 1846|p1392.htm#i139190|Mercy Kelsey Cutter|b. Jan 29, 1755\nd. Nov 27, 1843|p1392.htm#i139191|Albert Covenhoven|b. Oct 24, 1731\nd. between 1778 and 1779|p26.htm#i2575|Sarah Wyckoff|b. Jan 24, 1730\nd. Aug 30, 1807|p1392.htm#i139189|||||||

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Nancy Covenhoven was born on Apr 29, 1783 at Level Corner, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Robert Covenhoven and Mercy Kelsey Cutter. Nancy married Leonard Pfouts, son of Leonard Pfouts and Mary Ann Crane, on Feb 24, 1803 at Pine Creek Twp., Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Nancy Covenhoven died in 1847 at Point Twp., Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. She died on Nov 1, 1857 at age 74. She died on Nov 14, 1857 at Pfoutz Valley, Clinton County, Pennsylvania, at age 74. She died on Nov 14, 1857 at Jersey Shore, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, at age 74. Nancy was buried at Jersey Shore, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.
     She was also known as Mary Nancy Covenhoven. She was also known as Nancy Crownover. She and Leonard Pfouts resided at at Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Nancy Covenhoven and Leonard Pfouts

Nancy married Leonard Pfouts, son of Leonard Pfouts and Mary Ann Crane, on Feb 24, 1803 at Pine Creek Twp., Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.

Leonard Pfouts

M, #139193, b. Jan 18, 1772
Leonard Pfouts|b. Jan 18, 1772|p1392.htm#i139193|Leonard Pfouts||p2387.htm#i238666|Mary Ann Crane||p2387.htm#i238667|||||||||||||
      Leonard Pfouts was born on Jan 18, 1772 at Pfoutz Valley, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Leonard Pfouts and Mary Ann Crane. Leonard Pfouts was born on Jan 10, 1774. Leonard married Nancy Covenhoven, daughter of Robert Covenhoven and Mercy Kelsey Cutter, on Feb 24, 1803 at Pine Creek Twp., Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.
     Leonard Pfouts was also known as Leonard Pfoutz. He and Nancy Covenhoven resided at at Lycoming County, Pennsylvania.

Children of Leonard Pfouts and Nancy Covenhoven

Helen Mary Pfouts

F, #139194
Helen Mary Pfouts||p1392.htm#i139194|Leonard Pfouts|b. Jan 18, 1772|p1392.htm#i139193|Nancy Covenhoven|b. Apr 29, 1783\nd. Nov 1, 1857|p1392.htm#i139192|Leonard Pfouts||p2387.htm#i238666|Mary A. Crane||p2387.htm#i238667|Robert Covenhoven|b. Dec 7, 1755\nd. Oct 29, 1846|p1392.htm#i139190|Mercy K. Cutter|b. Jan 29, 1755\nd. Nov 27, 1843|p1392.htm#i139191|

Relationship=5th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Helen Mary Pfouts was the daughter of Leonard Pfouts and Nancy Covenhoven. Helen married Henry Edwin Brown on Nov 14, 1866.

Children of Helen Mary Pfouts and Henry Edwin Brown

Henry Edwin Brown

M, #139195
     Henry married Helen Mary Pfouts, daughter of Leonard Pfouts and Nancy Covenhoven, on Nov 14, 1866.

Children of Henry Edwin Brown and Helen Mary Pfouts

Gertrude Brown

F, #139196
Gertrude Brown||p1392.htm#i139196|Henry Edwin Brown||p1392.htm#i139195|Helen Mary Pfouts||p1392.htm#i139194|||||||Leonard Pfouts|b. Jan 18, 1772|p1392.htm#i139193|Nancy Covenhoven|b. Apr 29, 1783\nd. Nov 1, 1857|p1392.htm#i139192|

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Gertrude Brown was the daughter of Henry Edwin Brown and Helen Mary Pfouts. Gertrude married James Harry Phillips on Dec 26, 1899.

James Harry Phillips

M, #139197
     James married Gertrude Brown, daughter of Henry Edwin Brown and Helen Mary Pfouts, on Dec 26, 1899.

Laura Brown

F, #139198
Laura Brown||p1392.htm#i139198|Henry Edwin Brown||p1392.htm#i139195|Helen Mary Pfouts||p1392.htm#i139194|||||||Leonard Pfouts|b. Jan 18, 1772|p1392.htm#i139193|Nancy Covenhoven|b. Apr 29, 1783\nd. Nov 1, 1857|p1392.htm#i139192|

Relationship=6th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Laura Brown was the daughter of Henry Edwin Brown and Helen Mary Pfouts. Laura married Joseph Roger Townsend on Apr 3, 1900.

Joseph Roger Townsend

M, #139199
     Joseph married Laura Brown, daughter of Henry Edwin Brown and Helen Mary Pfouts, on Apr 3, 1900.

James Crownover

M, #139200, b. Sep 9, 1782, d. 1834
James Crownover|b. Sep 9, 1782\nd. 1834|p1392.htm#i139200|Robert Covenhoven|b. Dec 7, 1755\nd. Oct 29, 1846|p1392.htm#i139190|Mercy Kelsey Cutter|b. Jan 29, 1755\nd. Nov 27, 1843|p1392.htm#i139191|Albert Covenhoven|b. Oct 24, 1731\nd. between 1778 and 1779|p26.htm#i2575|Sarah Wyckoff|b. Jan 24, 1730\nd. Aug 30, 1807|p1392.htm#i139189|||||||

Relationship=4th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      James Crownover was born on Sep 9, 1782 at Level Corner, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Robert Covenhoven and Mercy Kelsey Cutter. James married Elizabeth Knox on Apr 14, 1806 at Pennsylvania. James Crownover died in 1834 at Mifflin Twp., Pennsylvania.
     He was also known as James Covenhoven.

Children of James Crownover and Elizabeth Knox

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