David Conover's Famous Cousins
Person Page 5873

         

Henry Hollenbeck (M)
#293601
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Henry Hollenbeck is the son of Jacob Hollenbeck and Helena Van Wie. Henry Hollenbeck married Margaret McFadden.

Child of Henry Hollenbeck and Margaret McFadden
Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck+

Catherine Lansing (F)
#293602

     Catherine Lansing married Gerrit Van Wie.

Child of Catherine Lansing and Gerrit Van Wie
Helena Van Wie+

Gerrit Van Wie (M)
#293603

     Gerrit Van Wie married Catherine Lansing.

Child of Gerrit Van Wie and Catherine Lansing
Helena Van Wie+

Margaret McFadden (F)
#293604

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Margaret McFadden married Henry Hollenbeck, son of Jacob Hollenbeck and Helena Van Wie.

Child of Margaret McFadden and Henry Hollenbeck
Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck+

Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck (M)
#293605
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck is the son of Henry Hollenbeck and Margaret McFadden. Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck married Eliza Anna Nichols.

Child of Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck and Eliza Anna Nichols
Jacob Grant Hollenbeck+

Eliza Anna Nichols (F)
#293606

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Eliza Anna Nichols married Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck, son of Henry Hollenbeck and Margaret McFadden.

Child of Eliza Anna Nichols and Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck
Jacob Grant Hollenbeck+

Jacob Grant Hollenbeck (M)
#293607
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Jacob Grant Hollenbeck is the son of Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck and Eliza Anna Nichols. Jacob Grant Hollenbeck married Maybelle A. Parmalee.

Child of Jacob Grant Hollenbeck and Maybelle A. Parmalee
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck b. 19 Nov 1893, d. 13 Oct 1966

Maybelle A. Parmalee (F)
#293608

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Maybelle A. Parmalee married Jacob Grant Hollenbeck, son of Jacob Wesley Hollenbeck and Eliza Anna Nichols.

Child of Maybelle A. Parmalee and Jacob Grant Hollenbeck
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck b. 19 Nov 1893, d. 13 Oct 1966

Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (M)
b. 19 November 1893, d. 13 October 1966, #293609
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=8th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck was also known as Clifton Webb. Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck was born on 19 November 1893. He was the son of Jacob Grant Hollenbeck and Maybelle A. Parmalee. Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck died on 13 October 1966 at age 72. From Who’s Who in America

WEBB, CLIFTON (Nov. 19, 1893-Oct. 13, 1966), singer, dancer, and actor, was born Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck in Indianapolis, Ind. In 1896 his family moved to New York City, and there, when he was seven, "Young Webb," as his mother liked to call him, accompanied a neighbor girl to dancing school. By chance, Malcolm Douglas of the Children's Theatre visited the school that day looking for a boy to play a role in one of his productions. He asked Webb if he would like to do some acting. Webb's mother had aspired to be an actress in her youth, and she readily gave her approval. She would become the most famous stage mother of her time, transferring her own theatrical ambitions to her young son. Webb's father apparently was not enthusiastic about the decision, and the parents soon separated. (Webb's mother once said of her husband, "We never speak of him, he didn't care for the theatre.")

Webb made his formal theatrical debut in 1900 at the Carnegie Hall Theatre in The Brownies. He next played the title role in a dramatization of Oliver Twist. The Master of Carlton Hall, in which he played a little southern boy, followed. After appearing in several more children's plays, Webb retired from acting for a while and resumed his education. An extremely bright student, he was able to graduate from grammar school in New York at the age of thirteen. He then studied painting with Robert Henri and singing with Victor Maurel. He gave his first one-man art show at the age of fourteen. He also soon acquired a love of opera and learned some fifteen operatic roles in French and Italian. This led to a contract with Boston's Aborn Opera Company in 1911, and he appeared in their production of Mignon when he was but seventeen. He later appeared in La boheme, Madame Butterfly, and Hansel and Gretel. In 1913 he played in a musical comedy entitled The Purple Road at the Liberty Theater in New York.

A dance craze was sweeping the country at this time, and Webb teamed up with Bonnie Glass and, later, Mae Murray as his dancing partner. Within a short time, the slender six-footer with the slightly upturned nose became one of the most popular ballroom dancers in New York City. In addition, Webb conducted private dancing classes, with his mother serving as secretary and manager of the Webb Dance Studio. He appeared in another musical comedy, Love o' Mike, in 19l7. This was followed by Listen, Lester (1918) and As You Were (1926). In 1921 the noted English producer Charles B. Cochran invited him to London. Webb spent two seasons in that city as well as one in Paris. He achieved great success in both places.

He then returned to the United States and appeared in the musical comedy Jack and Jill (1923). However, Webb yearned to play some straight roles and resented being known only as a hoofer. He decided to put away his dancing shoes forever. Working toward that goal, he appeared in a straight comedy, Meet the Wife (1923), and received excellent reviews. He worked in films during these years, too. He was a dapper costar of such films as Polly with a Past (1920), New Toys (1925), and The Heart of a Siren (1925). But Webb could not lay his dancing shoes aside for very long, and he had them on again when he appeared on the stage in Sunny (1925), which had a then fabulously successful run of ninety-two weeks. His nimble footwork was a highlight of other productions, including She's My Baby (1928), Treasure Girl (1928), the first Little Show (1929), Three's a Crowd (1930), Flying Colors (1932), and As Thousands Cheer (1933).

There followed an interlude in Hollywood when Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer put Webb on a salary of $3,000 a week. While socially it turned out to be a pleasant experience, professionally it was a disaster. For eighteen months, he swam, attended gala parties, met all the important people, but never once appeared in a motion picture. He referred to Hollywood as "a land of endowed vacations." Webb was able to get his five-year contract terminated, and returned again to New York. In 1936 he appeared in the Theatre Guild's production of And Stars Remain. Webb also played in a revival of Oscar Wilde's comedy The Importance of Being Earnest (1939) and in the summer of 1939 worked in a stock revival of Burlesque. For the next year and a half he went on tour as Sheridan Whiteside in The Man Who Came to Dinner. In 1942 he played the lead in Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit.

While Webb was touring the country in Blithe Spirit, he received his second call to Hollywood. Otto Preminger at Twentieth Century-Fox wanted the actor to portray the caustic and arrogant columnist Waldo Lydecker in Laura (1944). His performance was a tour de force in nastiness, and it earned him an Oscar nomination for best supporting actor and a long run as a Fox star. His acerbic character in Laura set the pattern for many subsequent roles. In his films, Webb epitomized the sophisticated, cosmopolitan, pompous, know-it-all type, with old-maid ways and an acid tongue. For instance, in The Dark Corner (1946) he played an uncle who secretly yearned to do away with his nephew. In The Razor's Edge (1946) he played Elliott Templeton, the archsnob and social tyrant, and earned another Oscar nomination as best supporting actor. He played these roles so superbly that he faced the danger of being stereotyped.

A much-needed change of pace came in 1948 when he portrayed a haughty gentleman-genius named Lynn Belvedere, who becomes a rather atypical nurse and baby-sitter to a brood of noisy children in Sitting Pretty. The film gained him excellent reviews and an Oscar nomination for best actor. He reprised this role in Mr. Belvedere Goes to College (1949) and Mr. Belvedere Rings the Bell (1951) and again was well received by the public and reviewers. He gave outstanding performances as Papa Gilbreth in Cheaper by the Dozen (1950) and an angel returned to earth in For Heaven's Sake (1950). In these pictures, his skill at nastiness was well mixed with sentimental comedy, and the public loved it. In 1950 he was selected by American motion-picture exhibitors as one of the year's top ten money-making stars.

Webb greatly enjoyed all this fame and fortune, which came to him in middle age. He was a bachelor and lived in Beverly Hills with his mother. Webb's taste in clothes, as well as his command of the social graces, was impeccable. He was a very sociable man and loved to entertain and go to parties. As in his Broadway years, his mother, Maybelle, was his constant companion, and they were one of the most popular "couples" in the Hollywood social set.

In the years after 1950, Webb also appeared in Elopement (1951), Dreamboat (1952), Stars and Stripes Forever (as John Philip Sousa; 1952), Titanic (1953), Mister Scoutmaster (1953), Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), Woman's World (1954), The Man Who Never Was (1956), Boy on a Dolphin (1957), The Remarkable Mr. Pennypacker (1959), Holiday for Lovers (1959), and Satan Never Sleeps (1962). Except for Dreamboat, Titanic, and Mister Scoutmaster, these films were of generally mediocre quality, and Webb's acting was not much praised by the critics. Part of the reason for so many unfavorable reviews was that he had become the exclusive property of Fox. Because he was gold at the box office, the studio put him in as many pictures as possible, but unfortunately, it had a dearth of distinguished writers and directors. Many of its pictures during this period emphasized Technicolor, Cinemascope, and spectacular location scenery over plot, dialogue, and character development. Part of the problem, too, was that Webb tended to play the familiar waspish character over and over. It worked well in several pictures, but was not well received in a number of others. He retired after Satan Never Sleeps and had serious health problems during the next several years. Webb died in Beverly Hills.

[There are no book-length studies of Webb. See Daniel Blum, Great Stars of the American Stage: A Pictorial Record (1952); Paul Michael and James Robert Parish, The American Movies Reference Book: The Sound Era (1969); Bill Libby, They Didn't Win the Oscars (1980); and David Thomson, A Biographical Dictionary of Film (1981). An obituary is in the New York Times, Oct. 14, 1966.] J. MICHAEL QUILL
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From "Celebrity Register"

WEBB, CLIFTON

ONCE CITED as the only man in Southern California who knew how to use a fish fork, he has long been regarded as Hollywood's most elegant actor - and obviously British in origin. The dignified ex-hoofer ("I was the first dancer to be accepted in real Society - not just Cafe Society") is not, however, British at all. He is, of all things, a Hoosier, and one who did not enter films until he was over 50, although he had spent some time in Hollywood in the Thirties waiting to do a Joan Crawford film which never materialized. His debut picture was Laura (1944) and nobody was surprised, least of all Webb, when he was nominated for an Academy Award. "The word "mediocrity" has never been in my vocabulary," he remarks.

Born 19 November 1891 in Indianapolis, Indiana, his original name was Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck. His mother, Maybelle, with whom he has always shared an extremely close relationship, was a woman of wit and perseverance, who had always desired to go on the stage herself. Failing this, she determined to guide little Webb's career. Mr. Hollenbeck took a dim view of his wife's plans, however and departed the scene. "We never speak of him," says Maybelle. "He wasn't interested in the theatre." By the time he was eight, Webb was an experienced performer. At 13, he quit school to study painting and music. At 17, he sang "Laertes" in the, Boston Opera Company production of Mignon, and at 19, he began his career as a dancer. He became (with his partner Bonnie Glass) the leading ballroom dancer in New York, and danced his way through musical comedies from Broadway to London in such hits as Love O' Mike, Sunny, The Little Show and Three's a Crowd. In 1933, his talents as a comedian came to the fore with his brilliant clowning in As Thousands Cheer, and shortly thereafter he was summoned to the West Coast. When nothing occurred, he went on tour with such comedies as The Importance of Being Earnest, Blithe Spirit and Present Laughter, before returning to Hollywood to begin a new career at a time when many performers consider retirement. With his role in Sitting Pretty (1948), of Mr. Belvedere, a remarkably wry baby sitter of devastating chic, Webb became a nationally popular movie star, and continued his characterization in several later pictures. Other films include The Razor's Edge, 1946; Cheaper by the Dozen, 1950; Stars and Stripes Forever, 1952; Three Coins in the Fountain, 1954, and The Man Who Never Was, 1956. Always impeccably dressed, almost as caustic off the screen as on, Clifton Webb ("It's never morals - it's manners") feels that "you can be rich and dull or poor and amusing - but you must always contribute something to the community." On the wearing of a handkerchief in one's coat pocket, he is adamant. "Never pointed," he says, never square. It should always be, of course, pear-shaped!

(h) 1005 N. Rexford Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif.

Marietje Van Buskirk (F)
#293611
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Webb Parmalee Hollenbeck (Clifton Webb Actor)

     Marietje Van Buskirk was the daughter of Laurens Van Buskirk and Elizabeth Demarest. Marietje Van Buskirk married Jacobus Hallenbeck, son of Hans Hallenbeck and Neeltje Van Loon. Marietje Van Buskirk married Jan Hallenbeck.

Child of Marietje Van Buskirk and Jacobus Hallenbeck
Jacob Hollenbeck+

Jan Hallenbeck (M)
#293612

     Jan Hallenbeck married Marietje Van Buskirk, daughter of Laurens Van Buskirk and Elizabeth Demarest.

Mary Given (F)
#293614
Pop-up Pedigree

Appears on charts:
Major General Johh Ellis Wool

     Mary Given was born at Of, Newton, Long Island, New York. She was the daughter of John Given. Mary Given married Jacobus Woll, son of Jurgen Woll and Altie Brouwer, on 14 July 1749.

Children of Mary Given and Jacobus Woll
John Wool+ b. 1750, d. 23 Jul 1790
Mary Woll b. 1752
Robert Woll b. 1754, d. 1826
James Woll b. 1756
Peter Woll b. 1 Sep 1758
Magdelena Woll b. 26 May 1761

John Given (M)
#293615

Child of John Given
Mary Given+

John Wool (M)
b. 1750, d. 23 July 1790, #293616
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=4th cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Major General Johh Ellis Wool

     John Wool was also known as John Woll. John Wool was born in 1750 at New York. He was the son of Jacobus Woll and Mary Given. John Wool married Ann Reliva on 31 May 1772 at New York City, New York County, New York. John Wool was Wheelmaker, Soldier. He died on 23 July 1790 at New York. John changed his last name from Woll to Wool, reason unknown. John was a wheel maker in New York City, New York before the Revolutionary War and he served in the that War. He served in Colonel John Knickerbocker's Regiment of the Albany Co. Militia and later in Captain Christopher Tillman's Company of the sixth Regiment of the Albany Co. Militia. By 1780 he lived at Newburgh, Orange Co. New York. By 1784 he was back in New York City. Shown in the First City directory as living at 14 Broad St. John was admitted freeman April 1, 1789.

Children of John Wool and Ann Reliva
Mary Wool b. 10 Mar 1773
Martha Wool b. 25 Sep 1779
Ann Wool b. 12 May 1781, d. 25 Oct 1847
Catherine Wool b. c 1782, d. 23 May 1816
Major General John Ellis Wool b. 31 Jan 1784, d. 10 Nov 1869
Elizabeth Granning Wool b. 18 Dec 1788
James Wool b. 7 Aug 1790, d. 6 Sep 1791

Ann Reliva (F)
b. circa 1750, #293617

Appears on charts:
Major General Johh Ellis Wool

     Ann Reliva was also known as Ann Relay. Ann Reliva was born circa 1750. She married John Wool, son of Jacobus Woll and Mary Given, on 31 May 1772 at New York City, New York County, New York. Ann Reliva was also called Relay. Following the death of her husband, Ann ran a boarding house called "Widow Wool's" boarding house at Liberty St. in 1794. She also sent some of the children to live at their Paternal Grandfather's home in Schaghticoke, New York. Ann was remarried in New York on June 1, 1794 to William Hutchins.

Children of Ann Reliva and John Wool
Mary Wool b. 10 Mar 1773
Martha Wool b. 25 Sep 1779
Ann Wool b. 12 May 1781, d. 25 Oct 1847
Catherine Wool b. c 1782, d. 23 May 1816
Major General John Ellis Wool b. 31 Jan 1784, d. 10 Nov 1869
Elizabeth Granning Wool b. 18 Dec 1788
James Wool b. 7 Aug 1790, d. 6 Sep 1791

Major General John Ellis Wool (M)
b. 31 January 1784, d. 10 November 1869, #293618
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Major General Johh Ellis Wool

     Major General John Ellis Wool was born on 31 January 1784 at Newburgh, Orange County, New York. He was the son of John Wool and Ann Reliva. Major General John Ellis Wool married Sarah Moulton on 27 September 1810 at Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. Major General John Ellis Wool died on 10 November 1869 at Troy, Rensselaer County, New York, at age 85. John Ellis Wool was born in Newburgh, New York, on February 29, 1784. He was orphaned at the age of four, and received little formal education. The War of 1812, however, provided an opportunity for him to advance in the military, and, by 1841, was promoted to brigadier general. Wool fought in the Mexican War, and was brevetted a major general for his service. He was then assigned to the command of the Eastern Military Division (1848-1853), the Department of the Pacific (1854-57) and the Department of the East (1857-61). When the Civil War began, he was given command of the Department of Virginia, while George B. McClellan was promoted to major general despite Wool's seniority. Wool held Fort Monroe against Confederate attacks, and independently occupied Norfolk, Virginia, refusing to serve under McClellan's command. Wool's successes led to his promotion to major general, although McClellan demanded that Wool's department be placed under his command for the Peninsula Campaign. Lincoln assented, and reassigned Wool to the command of the Middle Department in June of 1862. After leading the VII Corps in July of 1862, he served as commander of the Department of the East from January of 1863. Wool died on November 10, 1869, in Troy, New York., to which he had retired in 1863.

Robert Edward Lee Gano (M)
b. 22 February 1867, #293619
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=7th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Robert Edward Lee Gano was born on 22 February 1867 at Bourbon County, Kentucky. He was the son of Major General Richard Montgomery Gano and Martha Jones Welsh.

Sidney Johnson Albert Gano (M)
b. 22 February 1867, d. 7 July 1919, #293620
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=7th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Sidney Johnson Albert Gano was born on 22 February 1867 at Bourbon County, Kentucky. He was the son of Major General Richard Montgomery Gano and Martha Jones Welsh. Sidney Johnson Albert Gano died on 7 July 1919 at age 52.

Mitchel Ewing (M)
#293621

     Mitchel Ewing married (Unknown) Davis.

Child of Mitchel Ewing and (Unknown) Davis
Elizabeth Ewing+ d. Apr 1812

(Unknown) Davis (F)
#293622

     (Unknown) Davis married Mitchel Ewing.

Child of (Unknown) Davis and Mitchel Ewing
Elizabeth Ewing+ d. Apr 1812

Felix Turner Hughes (M)
#293623

     Felix Turner Hughes married Jean Amelia Summerlin.

Child of Felix Turner Hughes and Jean Amelia Summerlin
Howard Robard Hughes+ b. 9 Sep 1869, d. 29 Mar 1922

Jean Amelia Summerlin (F)
#293624

     Jean Amelia Summerlin married Felix Turner Hughes.

Child of Jean Amelia Summerlin and Felix Turner Hughes
Howard Robard Hughes+ b. 9 Sep 1869, d. 29 Mar 1922

Dr. John D. Grissim (M)
#293627

     Dr. John D. Grissim married Hannah A. R. Moore.

Child of Dr. John D. Grissim and Hannah A. R. Moore
Jeannette de la Fayette Grissim+

Hannah A. R. Moore (F)
#293628

     Hannah A. R. Moore married Dr. John D. Grissim.

Child of Hannah A. R. Moore and Dr. John D. Grissim
Jeannette de la Fayette Grissim+


         

Compiler:
David Kipp Conover
9068 Crystal Vista Lane

This page was created by John Cardinal's Second Site v1.9.16.
Site updated on 14 Mar 2008 at 10:00:52 AM from FAMOUS; 16,852 people